Skip to main content

View Diary: Researchers: Sea levels rising 60% faster than previously expected (142 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  not to mention Denmark (7+ / 0-)

    which aims to be 100% renewable, with 30% by 2025 (they're at 18% now, like California, roughly, I believe).

    Interestingly, my understanding is that a central part is buildling a distributied natural gas infrastructure that can be transitioned to renewables.  

    Hay hombres que luchan un dia, y son buenos Hay otros que luchan un año, y son mejores Hay quienes luchan muchos años, y son muy buenos. Pero hay los que luchan toda la vida. Esos son los imprescendibles.

    by Mindful Nature on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 04:12:15 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Denmark Is A Good Example On Many Levels (7+ / 0-)

      they have some of the cheapest and fastest Internet access in the world. 4-5 times (at least) faster than what we have for about half of what we pay. How they did it was kind of really simple.

      They gave the telecom companies, who alreqady had wiring into thge house, huge tax breaks if they'd wire fiber directly into houses. The catch was to get the tax break, they had to open up to fiber to anybody, even their competition, that wanted to offer some service/product.

      Funny thing, they were like OK, we can do that.

      But alas I fear that would never work here. Google just launched their fiber project in Kansas City and Time Warner is pissed. See Google is offering, for $79/month (about $35 for TV) Internet access that is as much as 20 times faster than ANYTING Time Warner offers.

      When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

      by webranding on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 04:18:14 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  In the US, the best way would be to (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Eric Nelson

        send data down the center of all the strung power line metal wiring.

        The electricity that comes to our homes, does not run through the copper wiring that leads to our homes.

        The power only runs along the outside of the copper wiring.

        Leaving the whole middle of the metal wire to carry data.


        "I like paying taxes...with them, I buy Civilization" -- me

        by Angie in WA State on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:42:14 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Do you know how small Denmark is? (0+ / 0-)

      It's not a valid comparison.  Sure, Rhode Island could be completely wind powered.  But that's not going to hold for the entire nation.

      And Denmark has French nuclear plants next door helping keep the grid stable.  Don't ignore that fact.

      •  There is no particular reason (0+ / 0-)

        It would not be scalable.  Except of course for the fact that Americans routinely fail where others succeed of course

        Whether France would have nukes in 2035 or beyond is anybody's guess.  In any event, the technologies involved by then are quite likely to be different.  As I noted Denmark is actually not quite keeping pace with California.  All it will take for us is better demand management and molten salt, probably

        Hay hombres que luchan un dia, y son buenos Hay otros que luchan un año, y son mejores Hay quienes luchan muchos años, y son muy buenos. Pero hay los que luchan toda la vida. Esos son los imprescendibles.

        by Mindful Nature on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 08:54:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Actually, it's the other way around. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JeffW
        Do you know how small Denmark is?
        It's not a valid comparison.  Sure, Rhode Island could be completely wind powered.  But that's not going to hold for the entire nation.

        And Denmark has French nuclear plants next door helping keep the grid stable.  

        The larger the area that's producing and consuming renewable electricity, the easier it is to balance out the power.  Denmark is so small that it is usually all in the same weather pattern.  Either it's windy and they have too much electricity or it's not windy and they don't have enough.  They have made an agreement with a nearby country (Norway, IIRC) that has a lot of hydroelectric dams.  On windy days Denmark sends excess power to the other nation, and it throttles down the hydropower.  On non-windy days, the other nation runs the hydroelectric plants harder, and sends extra power to Denmark.  

        In the US, different regions could make similar arrangements, without the need for international agreements.  If every sunny roof had photovoltaic (PV) panels, the amount of electricity running through electrical trunks would be reduced overall, because so much would be produced literally on top of where it was being used.  This would free up capacity to transmit power from where it was very sunny to where it was partly cloudy or lightly overcast.  Similarly, windy areas would send power to areas with less wind.  Since these areas change from day to day, it would be necessary to change the direction of power transmission from time to time, but it could be made to balance out in the end.  The larger the area is over which the electric supply needs to be balanced, the easier the balance is.  

        Renewable energy brings national global security.     

        by Calamity Jean on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 03:57:54 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site