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View Diary: Boehner just shot himself in the foot (170 comments)

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  •  The baseline is what we were doing before (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lostinamerica, pat bunny

    That's what is meant when you're not trying to redefine "cut" in some bizarre way.

    If I "lost" weight, it means that I weigh less than I did last year.  Not that I weigh less than some "baseline" based on some "policy".  That's how my investment people define my gains and losses in stocks or mutual funds.

    I'm a math nerd, and that's how you define what a change is.  DeltaY where y = f(x) means f(x+deltaX) - f(x).  If x is this year, and if deltaX is a year, then it's f(nextYear) - f(thisYear).  None of this "policy" and "baseline" stuff.

    •  That works when you are comparing one year (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VClib

      to the year before.  It doesn't work when you are talking about projecting cuts in spending for the next 10 years, which is how our government does budgeting.  In order to do that, you have to have a "baseline" for the next 10 years -- what spending would have been.  Then reductions from what spending would have been are your cuts.  

      •  That's what it is everywhere else. (1+ / 0-)
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        lostinamerica

        When they talk about NASA budget cuts, they mean it's cut with respect to last year, not with respect to a 10-year NASA baseline that was projected.

        That's how it is everywhere else in business, too.  When I got a salary increase of 3%, it was called a salary increase of 3%, not a salary cut of 1% even if some policy forecast said that over 10 years I should be getting an average 4% increase per year.  Calling it an increase wasn't a "gimmick"; it was the normal way of describing the event.

        •  I wish the terms everyone used were the (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          coffeetalk

          same for government spending and executive compensation. It would be nice if the word "cut" was reserved only for actual, real dollar reductions where Year B spending was actually lower than Year A. The problem with the word "cut" as it relates to federal budget issues is that no one knows what it actually refers to. In addition, "budget cuts" for any year past the next two are complete fiction. The current Congress can't dictate anything past the 113th session.  

          "let's talk about that"

          by VClib on Sun Dec 02, 2012 at 09:15:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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