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View Diary: A wolf in wolf's clothing - not quite a BBMF Chipmunk! (36 comments)

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  •  Very nice, took me back.... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Otteray Scribe, ER Doc, subtropolis

    Entry speed on the loop should be around 110mph, IIRC, with 90mph being seen over the top; the stall turn was nice (you get this gentlemanly shudder, as you saw); the roll rate ISN'T like a Xtra 360, BUT, a very precise machine for its time.

    I have some sad news...G-BDDD is no more. It suffered substantial damage at the LAA Rally at Sywell (hit a Rans RV-4 on the ground) and was deemed beyond economic repair!

    http://forums.flyer.co.uk/...

    A sad end for a lovely machine.

    'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

    by shortfinals on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:29:42 PM PST

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    •  There is no such thing as beyond economic repair (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shortfinals, ER Doc, subtropolis

      see: Girl, Glacier!!!!!!

      The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand. - Sun Tzu

      by Otteray Scribe on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:11:12 PM PST

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      •  Sadly, there is in terms of 'hull insurance' in .. (5+ / 0-)

        ...the U.K. If the insurer ALLOWS you, you may purchase the declared 'wreck' and restore it at your own cost. By the way, good luck in getting insurance for it! (Its NOT a nice system!)

        'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

        by shortfinals on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:34:36 PM PST

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        •  I think most warplane salvage and restoration (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          shortfinals, subtropolis, 43north

          is like that. People are recovering old wrecks that at one time were considered beyond hope.  I had the great privilege of being able to visit Middlesboro, KY a number of times during the restoration of the Glacier Girl P-38.  When they were first getting started, the hangar looked like the aftermath of a big explosion in an airplane parts factory.  As the 30,000+ parts came together, it turned into one beautiful bird.  It was the most authentic WW-II warbird in existence.  They used original mangled metal parts to fabricate perfect copies that were as good or better than any that could have been found on the Lockheed assembly line.  Many years and several million dollars later, it flew.  Of all the days to not be able to make it out of town, it was the day the P-38 flew for the first time since 1943.  Only one of the original pilots from the lost squadron was still living and present. The news video showed the old man with tears streaming down his cheeks.  

          You can get airshow liability insurance, but I don't know about hull insurance.  I have never tried to insure a pricey experimental airplane before.

          The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand. - Sun Tzu

          by Otteray Scribe on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:15:47 PM PST

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          •  Here is the REALLY bad news... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Otteray Scribe, 43north

            ...in the U.K. there is NO 'Experimental' class of aircraft. MUCH tighter regulatory framework, and so costs and insurance goes through any available roof you care to point at!

            'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

            by shortfinals on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:33:27 PM PST

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            •  What do they do about homebuilts (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              shortfinals, 43north

              or restored warbirds in private hands?

              The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand. - Sun Tzu

              by Otteray Scribe on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:36:31 PM PST

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              •  Homebuilts are supervised via the... (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Otteray Scribe, 43north

                ....Light Aircraft Association, who has CAA approved inspectors (they work on a one-to-one, staged approval basis with the builder)

                Restored warbirds are VERY hard! The CAA has a whole directorate who deal with projects like this, and approvals to work on such aircraft are handed out sparsely, and to a limited number of companies. Those who have such approvals mean BUSINESS....

                To give you one instance, a VERY well-known warbird owner (with a VERY large fleet) once imported a flying replica of a Fw190 into England. The whole thing dragged on for around 18 months, but because he couldn't PROVE the materials used, and their suitability or show a paper trail, he couldn't get a permit to fly, and the aircraft eventually departed the U.K.!!

                'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

                by shortfinals on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:48:09 PM PST

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          •  Glacier Girl (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            shortfinals, Otteray Scribe
            WWII P-38 Lightning marks 20 years since recovery from Greenland glacier

            On July 15, 1942, the Army Air Forces 94th Fighter Force’s six fighters and two bombers were forced to land on the Greenland glacier. The planes were part of Operation Bolero, a massive buildup and movement of Allied aircraft from the United States to Europe. The squadron flew a day earlier from Goose Bay, Labrador, Canada to Sondre Storm on the western coast of Greenland. They were flying over Greenland’s ice-capped mountains and the Denmark Strait and were headed to Reykjavik, Iceland, and eventually to Scotland. But the weather turned foul quickly, with temperatures falling to below minus-10, and the planes had to land on Greenland’s frozen glacier.

            An Army Air Force ski and dogsled team rescued the 25 crew members huddled inside the two B-17 Flying Fortresses three days later, but the eight planes remained for five decades, covered by ice and snow.

            In August 1980, Epps and Taylor heard about the lost squadron in a bar at a remote land strip during a stop on the way home from buzzing around the Arctic in a single-engine plane. Other pilots thought the two were crazy, but Epps, an Air Force veteran and 1998 Gathering of Eagles honoree, and Taylor, a U.S. Army Airborne during the Korean War, are both self-ordained adventurers. They thought nothing of taking a one-engine plane in extreme climates, even going as far as rolling the North Pole.

            All things in the sky are pure to those who have no telescopes. – Charles Fort

            by subtropolis on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 10:25:56 PM PST

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