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View Diary: Here's Scalia again, out schlepping his book, comparing morality of gays to morality of murderers. (209 comments)

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  •  I'm aware it's not original (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    commonmass, sfbob

    Forget which Latin poet expounded it to his detriment.  But no matter how many times it's expressed, the religion industry goes on undisturbed.

    Citizens United defeated by citizens, united.

    by Dallasdoc on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 07:14:48 AM PST

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    •  at least the Romans had fun gods (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      commonmass, sfbob, SilentBrook

      compared to the dour chap we have inherited

    •  As a part of the "religion industry" I have (7+ / 0-)

      to pick a tiny bone out of our salmon: there are many people in many different religions who are sincere and who are not interested in conning anyone. I, for one, would never suggest that anyone who does not feel called to do it, practice religion.

      You are right on this:

      Twisting themselves into knots to hang onto beliefs that are orthogonal to science and evidence is a pastime they may indulge, but I don't see why anyone else should.
      If you read the decision on same-sex marriage promulgated by the General Convention of the Episcopal Church last Summer, you won't find much knot-tying. What you'll find is reasonable people simply doing the right thing. Of course the third leg of the Three Legged Stool of Anglicanism is....REASON.

      I am gay, and I'm getting married in the Episcopal Church, just like my great-grandmother did.

      by commonmass on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 07:19:09 AM PST

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      •  I understand your point (9+ / 0-)

        ... and don't deny there are sincere people throughout the religion industry.  As an outsider, though, the whole enterprise can most easily be characterized in the way I've done above.  That is not to dishonor the sincere practitioners, who do much good motivated by the better angels of their beliefs.  

        I wrote the other day that I view religion as a personality intensifier:  it seems to amplify the best in some and the worst in others.  It just seems to this atheist like there ought to be easier and less baroque ways to get the best out of us.

        Citizens United defeated by citizens, united.

        by Dallasdoc on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 07:28:41 AM PST

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      •  Hey Common (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        commonmass

        I was editing a document the other day from a non-profit that used the term "industry" when referring to international development.  It annoyed me... we're not an industry, I thought.  But in a way, we are.  Same with religious organizations.  There is, however, a world of difference between the genuine practitioners of religion (and those in any sector of society) who approach each other with generosity of spirit, and who can see that there are seldom absolutes in this world, and on the other hand, those who are either crooks or cynics or opportunists.  Opportunism and manipulation help non-profits and churches stay afloat, in the ironically Darwinian world in which we live.  One could say that non-profits, like churches, have a dual mission - self perpetuation (i.e. meeting the payroll) and doing good works.  It all comes down to a question of results, and a question of whether practitioners in either profession remember what got them into it in the first place.

        “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” Charles Darwin

        by ivorybill on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 08:04:20 AM PST

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        •  Indeed. (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ivorybill, sfbob, SilentBrook, madhaus

          When our Bishop promulgated a letter telling the diocese that he would be adopting the new same-sex marriage rights adopted by General Convention given that Maine would become a marriage equality state on the 29th of December, he used the words "pastoral generosity". Not to seem big and tall, all with his "generosity" and all, but in the true meaning of the word, and inviting all Episcopalians in Maine to practice that generosity, even if they (and some of them do) object.

          Steve Lane is a good guy. He does the right thing. Scalia could learn from him.

          I am gay, and I'm getting married in the Episcopal Church, just like my great-grandmother did.

          by commonmass on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 08:08:03 AM PST

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