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View Diary: The cost of gerrymandering (255 comments)

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  •  With the crap from that Virginia legislator (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blue aardvark, J M F, ARS

    regarding allocation of electoral college votes by Congressional district, I'm leaning more strongly to
    1) state constitutional amendments mandating winner-take-all allocations, with strong criminal penalties and constitutional nullification of any (gerrymandered) Congressional district.  Allocation based on vote percentages would also be OK.
    2) multi-member Congressional districts with ranked-choice voting.

    The second option would pretty much negate the need for the first, but, one step at a time.

    I am become Man, the destroyer of worlds

    by tle on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 10:27:18 AM PST

    •  I don't like winner take all (4+ / 0-)

      But by CD is even worse. I would prefer either a national popular vote or doing states proportionally or a combination of proportional/winner take all like they do in the Democratic primaries.

    •  Better solutions (0+ / 0-)

      1. For the electoral vote, laws allocating electoral vote allocation to the winner of the popular vote nationally, along with a provision that it doesn't take effect unless states with 270 EVs have passed it.  This is an end run around a constitutional amendment to get rid of the electoral college.

      2. I favor ranked-choice voting but not in some states and not others.  This one has to happen by constitutional amendment so all states do it.  A good starting point is ranked choice voting for state legislatures (where the same dynamic is at work); this is a lot more doable and ultimately breaks up some of the congressional gerrymandering and creates a state level environment conducive to getting an amendment ratified.

      •  Good luck with that. (0+ / 0-)
        This one has to happen by constitutional amendment so all states do it.
        I think that's highly unlikely, especially with all those gerrymandered states.  However, in Florida, where I am, a state amendment can be passed, and we'd be in a position to immediately make the elected bodies more representative.  And whether the state amendment passes is not dependent on overcoming the existing gerrymandering - only on breaching the 60% threshold, which is hard enough.

        I am become Man, the destroyer of worlds

        by tle on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 01:42:49 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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