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View Diary: Indigo Kalliope: Poems from the Left; Haiku edition (22 comments)

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  •  My dear Batya, that's some of the best (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Batya the Toon, aravir

    poetry
    I've read anywhere,
    and it's about one of my favorite topics,
    the topic of what we're doing,
    writing,
    reading,
    reaching out to each other,
    as best we can:  

     We reach across the emptiness
    For nothing more than this, nor less:
    I've read your words.  I'm here.  
     

    Thank you so much for that.

    •  thank you! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bigjacbigjacbigjac

      The ovillejo is one of my favorite poem forms.  I tried for a haiku but it wasn't coming.

      •  I had to look it up. (0+ / 0-)

        I didn't even see
        the pattern of your poem,
        until I looked it up,
        and now I see.

        I also looked up my method,
        such as it is.

        From Wikipedia:

         Because of a lack of predetermined form, free verse poems have the potential to take truly unique shapes. Unrestrained by traditional boundaries, the poet possesses more license to express, and has more control over the development of the poem. This could allow for a more spontaneous and individualized product.  

        I enjoy it.

        But I like all the other methods,
        haiku,
        limerick,
        and your ovillejo.

        I truly enjoy the method
        of Dr. Seuss
        used in
        Green Eggs and Ham.

        It's
        and    1    2  3
        That Sam-I-am!
        and    1    2  3
        That Sam-I-am!
        and 1   2,   1     2,    1    2  3
        I    do not like that Sam-I-am!

        When the words would or will are used,
        it's
           1       2,   1      2,   1  2    3
        Would you like them in a house?
           1       2,   1      2,     1    2    3
        Would you like them with a mouse?

        And on and on.

        So much fun.

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