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View Diary: Saturday Morning Home Repair Blog (122 comments)

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  •  I'm really liking that tile (18+ / 0-)

    My living room has foot square fuzzy acoustic tiles that I have ALWAYS hated. (re creating stupid: I don't do it because I'm usully the one who fixes it. I can build stupid-- it takes longer and costs more money but if thats what you want......)

    that stuff looks like just the thing, a definitely doable solution---where did you get it? Do I have to take off the old ceiling tile ( I would expect so)

    Happy just to be alive

    by exlrrp on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 06:40:41 AM PST

    •  No! You don't have to remove the old tiles. (15+ / 0-)

      I wrote that I spent a bunch of time prepping the ceiling, but that's misleading.  You can put these things up over just about anything.    Acoustic, popcorn, you name it.  As long as it's reasonably level, you can fake it.  I spent a bunch of time on ours because half of it was ready to fall down, but if your surface is stable, go for it.

      www.decorativeceilingtiles.com

      Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

      by CJB on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 06:55:41 AM PST

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      •  ? (9+ / 0-)

        You can put these up over popcorn? How would that work? What kind of prep do you think would go into covering my execrable popcorn?

        •  Man, I wish I had a camera. (8+ / 0-)

          Take another look at that picture.  See that pattern?  The tiles aren't flat on the back.  They're pressed, so the back of the tile is concave in the shape of the pattern.  You daub the tile glue on the back - we did nine blobs about the size of - what? - a shooter marble, maybe a little bigger - and then stick it up there.  With a popcorn ceiling, you're going to press just enough to get those blobs to flatten out and grip the popcorn.  There will actually be some pockets of air between the tile and the ceiling.  You see what I mean?  Press too much and you'll have popcorn bumps.  Press just enough, and the popcorn actually helps "grab" the glue.

          And this is all theoretical because our ceiling was flat plaster after I scraped it, but I wouldn't hesitate at all to tackle a popcorn ceiling.  The only thing you might do before beginning is to sweep the ceiling with a stiff bristle broom to take off dirt and cobwebs and loose bits of texture.

          Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

          by CJB on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:30:27 AM PST

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          •  ah (7+ / 0-)

            yeah I get it!  It sounds do-able! (famous last words.) I'll order the sample and give it a go. After. After the bamboo floor and recovery therein. ha! Thanks.

          •  Don't you hate trying to flatten popcorn? (6+ / 0-)

            Previous owner used it all over the walls and ceiling up the stairs, then over the entire bathroom above the wainscoting. Figured I'd try "removing" it, starting with the bathroom, so we could make it look "normal" - but after scraping on the walls for an hour, and a bit of cussin' "teh stupid" I gave it up and got out a belt sander............

            Made a little dust, (OK, a LOT!) but thanks to lots of plastic and tape it was just a matter of a little cleaning up with the shop vac (OK, a LOT!) - and decided there was no way I was going to tackle the ceiling too, so I rocked that with 3/8", smeared a coat of plaster on the walls, wet-sanded, screen-sanded, and then just primed it all  - looked pretty good, IIDSSM.

            Also gave up the entire idea of trying to do the stairs; painted all of that a light color, and try to not look at it. I have applied popcorn several times on paid jobs, but personally, I hate it!

            "...greed and selfishness and striving for undue riches can never bring lasting happiness or good to the individual or to his neighbors." FDR

            by CodeTalker on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:42:30 AM PST

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            •  Yeah, it's nasty stuff, (6+ / 0-)

              as your comment so ably shows. :-)

              Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

              by CJB on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 02:02:22 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  to remove, isn't soaking and scraping recommended? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              CJB, Unknown Quantity

              it is nasty, and depending on how old, contains a crap load of asbestos for strength...10-15% by weight.
                Modern stuff probably has some and some figlas fibers instead..but anyway, sanding and making dust are very NOT recommended...and we all have done it, gulp.

              I bet Mr Google would have a video on 'removing popcorn ceiling.'
                soak, scrape, right?

              And masks, but keep the scrapings  wet/damp, no dust, work as clean as you can, when you start making a dusty mess stop and take a break...and have a clean room entrance/exit made with plastic where you can change shoes and cloths and kinda wash off.
               The idea being to soak the popcorn drywall putty it is..right? and not soak the drywall under it..you will soon learn the right timing and amount. I did it once long ago...

              I have worked with lots of asbestos in boat building and almost had fistfights getting shop people to stop cleaning the dust with an air nozzle instead of wet sawdust..we soon stopped using it, but it was the best additive for strength...we bought, I bought pallets of it, torn open bags like cement, dust all over...no more for me, thanks.

              This machine kills Fascists.

              by KenBee on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 01:25:09 AM PST

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        •  If you go to (7+ / 0-)

          Decorative Ceiling Tiles, you can order a sample pack of 3 for 11 bucks.

          Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

          by CJB on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:35:54 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  When was your house built? (6+ / 0-)

          Prior to 1978 they used asbestos in the popcorn.  If your house was built after that, there's an easy way to remove it. If you have a large area to remove, get a hand sprayer like farmers use -- a spray bottle will work, but your wrist will get sore.  Just spray / spritz water on the ceiling - enough to saturate the surface, but it doesn't have to be running down the walls.  That crap then just scrapes off, with no gouging if you're careful.  I used a wide plastic putty thing for the scraping, and an empty paper-box top to hold the scrapings.  Oh, and I put plastic over the floors to catch all the crap and make clean up easier.

          I started at the back of my house, just dry-scaping, then "sanding" with a drywall rasp, before discovering this easy method.  Do NOT use the liquid product (got mine at Home Depot) that sprays on -- it dripped down the wall and then paint wouldn't adhere to it. :o(

          Also, there are labs you can send samples of the popcorn and they can tell you if it has asbestos in it.  IMO, popcorn ceilings were a lazy builders way to hide imperfections in the ceiling, rather than do them right.  I, too, hate them!

      •  Faking level (8+ / 0-)

        The more pattern a surface has and the less glossy the paint, the less likely it is that you'll see that it's not level.  Plus, if anyone is checking your ceiling for level, they deserve what they get!

        A while ago, one of the boat magazines I read (I promise, just for the articles!) has a piece entitled "In Defense of Flat Paint" talking about all the lumps and bumps that flat paint hides.  

        The human race has one really effective weapon, and that is laughter. -Mark Twain

        by boatgeek on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:58:36 AM PST

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        •  Exactly! (7+ / 0-)

          Flat paint is like a big old bandaid.

          Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

          by CJB on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 09:02:08 AM PST

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          •  I prefer eggshell - one level above flat (6+ / 0-)

            Eggshell finishes hide almost as well as flat, are more resistant to smudges, scrapes, and dirt, clean more easily, and hide almost as well as flat.

            Had to paint gloss finishes on many commercial jobs, mostly office trim, bathrooms, and kitchens; it's nearly impossible to make it look good on surfaces not prepped properly - it shows everything! That was my specialty in the Painter's Union, and the reason I was bumped to "mechanic" instead of a grunt the first month. (higher pay rate, too - yay!) Took a long time to fully learn how to apply it properly, but the results are worth it if you have to use it.

            Especially when painting cars!

            "...greed and selfishness and striving for undue riches can never bring lasting happiness or good to the individual or to his neighbors." FDR

            by CodeTalker on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:49:42 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

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