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View Diary: Boehner Needs To Become The Speaker Of The House, Not Speaker Of the Republicans (13 comments)

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  •  don't they need a majority? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gary Norton
    However, if there were to be a split in the caucus when they vote in January, it would result in Pelosi being elected Speaker. to the best of my knowledge no leader of the minority party in the house has ever been elected Speaker.
    I'm not sure if works that way. I think they need a majority of the votes cast (as opposed to a plurality), but I'm not fully sure on that. Also, if a majority oppose a particular elected speaker (I'm sure even if they can't agree on anything else, all the Republicans will agree that Pelosi shouldn't be speaker!) then couldn't they force a re-vote?

    A more likely scenario in the event of a truly divided house Republican caucus would be Democrats and moderate Republicans agreeing on a compromise candidate and/or a comprise agenda (perhaps even Bohner though I suspect his speaker-ship would be much different if he was supported by a coalition of Republicans and Democrats) and voting together for that person.

    A similar situation has occurred in the New York and Washington state Senates in which leadership is to be controlled by such a coalition (in those cases it is a small number of moderate democrats who broke ranks with the Democratic party).

    •  Normally, yes - Gary's thesis assumes a majority (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      scotths

      composed of all Democrats and sufficient centrist GOP reps to push Pelosi's vote totals over the 50% margin.

      There were a couple of Speaker elections that toyed with plurality voting outcomes - but that needn't happen here.

      •  it seems highly unlikely to me (0+ / 0-)

        that a Republican would vote for Nancy Pelosi. Even if they determined they agreed with her policies or how she would lead the house more than they agreed with the (presumably very conservative) candidate the majority of the Republican caucus chose, I think the image she has (both fair and unfair) would make it politically impossible for them to vote for her. A split in the Republican vote leading to an inconclusive result followed by an emergence of a compromise candidate that both Democrats and Moderate Republicans can vote for seems much more likely to me.

        Normally, yes - Gary's thesis assumes a majority composed of all Democrats and sufficient centrist GOP reps to push Pelosi's vote totals over the 50% margin.

        There were a couple of Speaker elections that toyed with plurality voting outcomes - but that needn't happen here.

        Are you suggesting here that a plurality result could be binding in certain situations? If that is true, that would change the situation somewhat...

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