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View Diary: Port strike averted for now (26 comments)

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  •  so the royalty issue (6+ / 0-)

    that the Maritime alliance made a big deal about is now settled?

    From yesterday's diary:

    The maritime alliance, known as USMX, says it paid $211 million in container royalties to the longshoremen last year, averaging $15,500 per eligible worker. James A. Capo, the alliance’s chairman, said that came to $10 an hour, on top of what he said were already generous wages.
    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    I am shocked this was done and the strike averted.

    Is it possible unions are now starting to get stronger as the economy improves?

    "The only person sure of himself is the man who wishes to leave things as they are, and he dreams of an impossibility" -George M. Wrong.

    by statsone on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 09:20:41 AM PST

    •  love (5+ / 0-)

      Gotta love the longshoremen--they are united--when they threaten a strike, USMX knows they mean it--and therefore, the union is powerful.  In a better world, the longshoremen would take over the AFL/CIO and enforce discipline.  Young Americans need to know to respect picket lines, and respect employee strength.  Right now, employers have all the guns.

      Apres Bush, le deluge.

      by melvynny on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 09:27:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The USMX has more power (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        suesue

        because it isn't like you can outsource unloading cargo containers to Asia.

        My question is how they managed to organize the ports in the southern right to work states. Other than the huge Newport News Shipyard, you have to look long and hard to find a unionized manufacturing facility in the south.

        •  ILA in the South... (0+ / 0-)

          There is a long, complex and fascinating history of ILA organizing in the South.

          Much of it took place before the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act, so organizers faced an extremely hostile environment, both in the workplace and in the courts.

          Under Jim Crow, ILA developed a system of segregated
          all-white and all-black locals in southern ports. I don't think they are entirely integrated even to this day.

        •  ILA in the South.... (0+ / 0-)

          Most of the ILA locals in the South were organized before the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act and the subsequent introduction of right-to-work (for less) laws.

          Most of the southern longshore locals also operated under the rule of Jim Crow, so ports typically had separate all-white locals and all-black locals. This was outlawed in the 1960s,  but vestiges of this remain in some places.

      •  addenda (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JayRaye

        How about Trumka proclaiming 2013, "The Year of the Strike"?

        Apres Bush, le deluge.

        by melvynny on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 09:48:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Yes! the Longshoremen have a proud history: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AoT, suesue

        WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Dec: Life so cheap; property so sacred.

        by JayRaye on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 09:59:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  WE NEVER FORGET (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AoT, suesue

          Bloody Thursday
          July 5, 1934
          San Francisco

          Howard Sperry-striking longshoreman
          Nick Bordoise-unemployed cook volunteering
             at ILA strike kitchen

          WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Dec: Life so cheap; property so sacred.

          by JayRaye on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 10:11:05 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I used to go by the hiring hall on my way to work (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            JayRaye, suesue

            for a couple of years.  They've got the outlines of the murdered union members on the ground outside of the hiring hall.  That was my real introduction to labor history in the US.

            The revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

            by AoT on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 11:36:01 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

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