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View Diary: Abbreviated Pundit Round-up: Congress isn't the problem, House Republicans are (170 comments)

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  •  I won't ignore anyone who says it's "both sides" (1+ / 0-)
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    eeff

    The passed a bill last night that creates 700 billion in tax revenue and 3.9 trillion dollars in debt.  That bill originated in the Senate, so unless you can justify that or tell me that not a single Democrat voted for a budget or to fund a war since Clinton, I am going to believe that.    You can ignore the truth if you want to.

    Intolerance betrays want of faith in one's cause. - Gandhi

    by SpamNunn on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 04:55:33 AM PST

    •  apples and oranges (3+ / 0-)

      I am talking dysfunctionality, you are talking policy you don't like. But which got passed by a huge majority in the Senate.

      This time.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:00:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Point missed badly (10+ / 0-)

      We are in this current fiscal mess largely because the Republican Party is truly the problem, and has been for decades.   Have Democrats had a hand in this mess?  Yes, but here are just two salient numbers to consider:

      1) When taxes were raised under Bill Clinton and Congress in 1993-1994, not a single (zero, nada, zilch) Republican voted for the bill.  Not one.  And this was when the Republican Party was ostensibly less nuts than it is today.

      2) In 2002, when votes were taken in Congress to authorize use of force in Iraq, of the combined 156 “No” votes cast, 7 (or 4.5%) were Republican, 147 (or 94.2%) were Democratic, and 2 (or 1.3%) were Independent.

      Yes, many Democrats voted for the use of force resolution in October of 2002; many, no doubt, out of sheer pre-election self-preservation, given the god-awful post 9/11 jingoistic atmosphere ginned-up by shameless Republican assholes like Rudy Guili911i, and exemplified by Saxby Chambliss's morally filthy campaign against Max Cleland.  Good grief, they have not been the party of Joe McCarthy for nothing!

      But there is simply no getting around the fact that the Iraq war – a war conceived by a delusional cadre of right-wing Republican chicken-hawk PNAC neo-cons in the 1990s – received a near-unanimous stamp of approval from congressional Republicans in 2002.

      To paraphrase James Carville:  It's the Repubicans, stupid. Let's keep the eye on that big fat ball, folks:  It is called the 2014 mid-term.

    •  debt can be attacked long term (1+ / 0-)
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      ratcityreprobate

      revenue needs are short term.  Making these things parallel is part of the flawed logic of this whole debate.

      Debt can be turned into revenue.  But lack of revenue can't do anything to either create revenue or reduce debt.

      The issue isn't revenue vs. debt anyway.  The issue is austerity politics versus economic stimulus and growth, which Greg has very clearly delineated.  

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:46:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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