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View Diary: A sheep in wolf’s clothing – DeH 89A Dragon Rapide (31 comments)

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  •  Beautiful Aircraft (8+ / 0-)

    On this side of the pond we tend to forget there was anything besides the Ford Tri-Motor (ripped off from Fokker) or the DC-3 before the jet age for the airlines.

    "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

    by xaxnar on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 09:32:42 AM PST

    •  If you saw the earlier diary on the Avro 19... (6+ / 0-)

      ...you will see the 'small airliner category' was quite well-catered for in the U.K. The Airspeed Oxford (to be covered soon) a fine training aircraft, was based on the AS.6 Envoy air-taxi/feeder airliner.

      'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

      by shortfinals on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 10:21:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I suspect it's geography at work in part (5+ / 0-)

        Most European countries correspond to the size of states in the United States.  Smaller airliners make sense for smaller regions, especially when the developments are taking place under the oversight of national governments, and national boundaries define markets.

        "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

        by xaxnar on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 10:57:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Indeed so! Still, even minature airliners for.. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          xaxnar, Otteray Scribe, subtropolis

          ...minature countries are exciting! :)

          Let's see, I've covered the Rapide, and the Avro Nineteen, and the Oxford (a.k.a Envoy airliner) will come soon. I also have the Twin Pioneer to write on...a military and civil twin-engined transport (post WW2) which is the LAST flowering of the small British transport aircraft!

          'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

          by shortfinals on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 11:21:40 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Off topic, but - Just noticed an odd phrase (4+ / 0-)

            "under the oversight"

            Oversight is a strange word. If you commit an oversight, you overlook something, meaning you forgot it.

            If you exercise oversight, you're actually paying attention.

            Imagine the chagrin of a hypothetical committee tasked with certain duties at which they failed: The Highway Public Access Oversight Committee committed an oversight when they overlooked the need for a scenic overlook on the MI 5 bypass. They overlooked it when they were looking over the preliminary surveys.

            GAH!

            "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

            by xaxnar on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 11:37:40 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  It comes from Parliamentary use... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              eyesoars

              ....Select Committees in the U.K. have 'oversight' of a certain area of activity. You are 'under' their 'oversight' in that case!

              English is quirky, and is the kind of language that lurks in a dark alley, wait for other languages to stroll by, then mugging them, and going through their pockets for odd nouns, a verb here or there, and a pretty adjective! (English has words from Dutch, Hindi, Latin, German, Norwegian, French, Persian and many other languages)

              'Per Ardua Ad Astra'

              by shortfinals on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 03:49:08 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

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