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View Diary: Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 1/8 (342 comments)

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  •  -_- Figures. The hypocrite. (0+ / 0-)

    Was there any white southern Democrat in that era (the Jim Crow era) who was pro-civil rights?  Rep. Ken Hechler marched with MLK, but he was from WV, which defected from the CSA.  Who was that Georgian Democrat who proudly voted for the Civil Rights act even though he well knew that Lestor Maddox would rain wrath down upon him?  Also, there's LBJ, of course.

    Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

    by KingofSpades on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 12:44:18 PM PST

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    •  Well, sure there were (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, MichaelNY

      Then-Speaker Sam Rayburn reluctantly supported civil rights legislation starting in the 1950s.

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 12:47:21 PM PST

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      •  I know, I just wanted someone to list from memory (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        Yeah, Rayburn was from NE Texas, a Dixiecrat area.

        Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

        by KingofSpades on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 12:48:28 PM PST

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        •  and i'd imagine that (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY, bumiputera

          Rayburn dying in 1961 and being replaced with a Massachusetts Dem sped up the process of meaningful civil rights legislation.

          The Republican Party isn't a party of small government, it's a party of a government for the few. @bhindepmo

          by RBH on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 01:06:08 PM PST

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          •  McCormack wasn't that liberal either (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY, levlg, KingofSpades

            He was decent supporter of the vietnam war, though he did preside over the one of most liberal congressional sessions since the new deal. House Liberals grew tired of him by the end of the 1960's and he promptly retired in 1970.

             I don't think Rayburn was that anti-civil rights either in the grand scheme of things. IIRC:  He was prepared to strip many southerners from their chairmanships/seniority over civil rights legislation nearing the end of the 1950s.

            I want to say in the 5 speakers that followed Rayburn, Tip Oneill was the most liberal.

            24, gay Atari Democrat CA-41

            by lordpet8 on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 01:19:47 PM PST

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    •  if we limit that to people who got elected (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, MichaelNY

      probably not that many elected passed using current standards. Some Southern Dems didn't sign the manifesto but couldn't go full-integration.

      Not sure on if there was really much of a states-rights/backlash upcurrent in WV. They did elect some civil rights friendly Republicans in the 1950s.

      The border state approach to school desegregation seemed to be "Ok, we don't have many African-Americans in this area, so let's just integrate so we don't have to pay for a separate school covering a huge geographic area"... there were exceptions in MO, but in some parts of MO, integration came quick.

      The Republican Party isn't a party of small government, it's a party of a government for the few. @bhindepmo

      by RBH on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 12:50:54 PM PST

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    •  looking at Civil Rights act of 1964 Passage (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, MichaelNY

      6 or 7(there is a discrepency on wikipedia) Southern House Democrats (one was fellow texan J.J. Pickle) and 1 southern Democratic Senator (Ralph Yarborough) voted for the bill

      24, gay Atari Democrat CA-41

      by lordpet8 on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 01:00:16 PM PST

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      •  House vote (5+ / 0-)

        It was really a regional vote. IL voted 23-1, PA 27-0, OH 22-1, and IN 10-1 in favor even though all 4 delegations were majority GOP. NY went 41-0 and NJ 15-0. WV voted 5-0 in favor so at that point it was definitely northern when it came to civil rights. OK was 3-2 in favor, suggesting that it wasn't really southern on that issue either.

        Southerners who voted for it, all Dems:
        Claude Pepper, FL
        Charles Weltner, GA
        Carl Perkins, KY (which was 6-1 against)
        Ross Bass, TN
        Richard Fulton, TN
        Jack Brooks, TX
        Albert Thomas, TX
        Jake Pickle, TX
        Henry Gonzalez, TX

        http://www.govtrack.us/...

        SSP poster. 43, new CA-6, -0.25/-3.90

        by sacman701 on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 02:15:51 PM PST

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    •  A few (4+ / 0-)

      Claude Pepper, Ralph Yarborough, Lyndon Johnson, Estes Kefauver, and Albert Gore (though he chickened out in the 1964 CRA, he voted for all the other major legislation on the subject) in the Senate. In the House I'm not quite so sure--Rayburn favored voting rights at least, and probably a few people from Tennessee and Texas, I'd have to look. Those two states tended to produce most of the less-racist politicians for various reasons. I'm pretty sure all the East Tennessee Republicans voted for it.

    •  the most liberal dems from the old CSA (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, lordpet8

      off the top of my head were:

      Bob Eckhardt
      Dante Fascell
      Dick Fulton
      David Pryor
      Bill Anderson
      Sam Gibbons
      Claude Pepper
      Hale Boggs
      Henry Gonzalez
      Bill Alexander

      RRH expat (known as AquarianLeft). Also known as freepcrusher on leip atlas forum

      by demographicarmageddon on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 02:07:15 PM PST

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    •  Mentioned but (4+ / 0-)

      just to put an exclamation point on it: Ralph Yarbrough!  Didn't sign the Southern Manifesto and voted for every Civil Rights Bill between 1957-1970.

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