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View Diary: This Is Why *We* Have Guns (141 comments)

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  •  Well, Bean was (7+ / 0-)

    wont to wander off alone and wasn't exactly the brightest fella. I wondered the same thing because Rio - the leader - is pretty aggressive.

    Thank your stars you're not that way/Turn your back and walk away/Don't even pause and ask them why/Turn around and say 'goodbye'/Just wish them well.....

    by Purple Priestess on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 08:49:37 PM PST

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    •  On the plus side, I don't think you will need to (8+ / 0-)

      worry about any losses if they are around Rio.
      But, if they already took one, they will try again, and this time of year the stress of dealing with it (not to mention any wounds) can take its toll as well.
      I couldn't imagine trying to get coyotes in a forested area, my father is big into coyote hunting, but we are in agriculture territory--lots of open space.
      I realize that you didn't do this diary for advise, but hunting them is definitely the way to go--poison will just kill dogs.
      Seeing as how the coyotes have obviously gotten into a pack & they took something as tough as an alpaca, they are hungry (coyotes generally only pack during winter & food is scarce). If they are hungry, they will be stupid. You may be able to call them in.
      Have the rifle at the ready, if you knock down their pack by just 2 or so, they won't have the strength to take on one of your animals again (until next year).

      Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.

      by FrankRose on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 09:05:27 PM PST

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    •  I forgot to add. (10+ / 0-)

      Although, I am sure you are already aware, if you have any dogs, or cats that you value, lock them up at night.
      Frankly, I am shocked they tried took on an alpaca. They're going to try to kill anything that moves if they were willing to tackle something as tough as an alpaca.
      Expect them to try again in a week or so.

      Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.

      by FrankRose on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 09:09:49 PM PST

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      •  The cats are all indoor cats. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        agent, bontemps2012

        Even before this we'd never want them outside. And the barn cat is very good at taking care of himself.

        Thank your stars you're not that way/Turn your back and walk away/Don't even pause and ask them why/Turn around and say 'goodbye'/Just wish them well.....

        by Purple Priestess on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 09:11:42 PM PST

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      •  I'm not. Alpaca's aren't very big (5+ / 0-)

        About the size of smaller goats and sheep.
        A llama (I have one for predation prevention), is big- 400lb or so- about the size of a pony or small horse. And that definitely gives coyotes pause! (because my guy isn't that bright. .  yet. He's pretty young.)

        Purple Priestess-
        Have you considered a llama? (picked up mine at auction for $20) They'll get along very well with alpacas (although you probably want a gelded male since they can cross breed)
        And I am of the same mind as you! Guns for predator control and/or hunting. I had some unnerving incidents living in the city but none of those situations would have been helped with a gun. Never felt the need for gun even after.
        Another thing- I had problems with a bobcat getting my ducks and chickens. I put a light on at night with the poultry and that seemed to help. (I don't lock them up at night) The geese getting adult enough to get aggressive helps in the day.
        My best luck is my property is pretty flat and open around my livestock. I think that's helped keep coyotes away from me because they're a problem for my neighbors (more wooded).

        I am much too liberal to be a Democrat.

        by WiseFerret on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 10:09:50 PM PST

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        •  We haven't sought one out (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          WiseFerret, JesseCW

          but we'd happily adopt one if it became available. The chickens have a coop and they stay there at night. The raccoons will get them otherwise. Geese... there's a thought.

          Thank your stars you're not that way/Turn your back and walk away/Don't even pause and ask them why/Turn around and say 'goodbye'/Just wish them well.....

          by Purple Priestess on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 10:49:11 PM PST

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        •  Coyotes will take geese (4+ / 0-)

          Nothing else bothered mine until coyotes moved into the neighborhood, but they really took a lot of geese then.  I was working an evening shift and wasn't home then to get them into their shed.

        •  An alpaca runs 100 lbs-185 lbs. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Purple Priestess

          100 lbs is twice the size of a huge male coyote & 4-5 times the size of an average coyote.
          One stomp and a coyote will likely be injured enough to not make it through winter.
          You have to remember, the coyotes aren't looking for a fight-they're looking for a meal.
          Meals that can give them a fight are last on their very large list of prospective meals.

          Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.

          by FrankRose on Mon Jan 07, 2013 at 10:39:32 AM PST

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      •  Not much danger to decent size dogs. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        blueoasis, Purple Priestess

        “I’m able to fly, do what I want, essentially. I guess that’s what freedom is — no limits.” Marybeth Onyeukwu -- Brooklyn DREAMer.

        by chuco35 on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 10:32:32 PM PST

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        •  Did anyone see the coyote kill or did you just (5+ / 0-)

          find the carcass?  I'm thinking like the other posters who find it very unusual that a coyote would go after such a large animal.  You mention that you have mountain lions, now that is a much more likely suspect to take down an alpaca.

          The other day I watched a coyote walk right through a herd of cattle.  Even stopped the car to watch.  It seemed to care less about getting anything to eat even with a bunch of new calves in the herd.

          Around here we don't bother with the coyotes since they seem to fill themselves with small critters and leave the bigger stuff alone.  Now mountain lions can be a problem.

          Congressional elections have consequences!

          by Cordyc on Sun Jan 06, 2013 at 11:44:47 PM PST

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        •  Depends on the dogs. Big and tough aren't (3+ / 0-)

          synonyms.

          A pack will lure a dog away from home, run him in relays to tire him out (reverse of how they hunt deer) and then circle and take him apart bite by bite.

          I've had the joy of finding a 50 lb setter taken apart by coyotes.  

          "Furthermore, if you think this would be the very very last cut ever if we let it happen, you are a very confused little rabbit." cai

          by JesseCW on Mon Jan 07, 2013 at 04:57:37 AM PST

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      •  they may be coydogs and if so all bets are off on (3+ / 0-)

        behavior....Coydogs are bigger generally and dont have the fear of humans yotes do...

        never 22 short unless they are within 10 yards, I only shoot them in my inner yard and use the 60g Aguila subsonics with either a head or front chest shot then give them the coup once they fall.....very short range and they havent ran yet with a hit......

        243 is another very good choice,  flat shooting accurate and will take anything from yotes to deer......

        Vaya con Dios Don Alejo
        I want to die a slave to principles. Not to men.
        Emiliano Zapata

        by buddabelly on Mon Jan 07, 2013 at 10:04:45 AM PST

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