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View Diary: Bookflurries-Bookchat: What a Character! (170 comments)

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  •  A couple of other ways to know the character. (6+ / 0-)

    7. (My favorite): What is the character BLIND to?  That's the thing that I'm always alert for.  Sometimes it is obvious, like in Othello, when Othello can't see he's being manipulated and it makes us want to stand up and scream at him on stage.  Sometimes it's less obvious.  When we know the character can't understand all the things we see in the story, it distances us a little from the character and lets us inspect them for their weaknesses and conceits and see the whole story as a broader landscape that encompasses more than just how the protagonist or narrator feels about things.

    8. What does the character feel guilty about or ashamed of?  Interesting characters often have one thing that causes them internal pain and creates conflict in their choices.  And often we don't KNOW what that guilt or shame is, but we can tell there is one because the character does such odd or destructive things.  Figuring it out, then, is a mystery to be solved that can take up most of the book.  

    ...

    I listened to an audiobook of Lady Auderley's Secret, a Victorian mystery, this week.  It wasn't too bad.  I think I like the slow convoluted British sentence structures in old novels like these when I'm listening to them in audiobook form.  I tried to start the free audiobook of Jules Verne's Mysterious Island, but it was too fast-paced and exciting from the beginning to just relax into when I've got a headache, so I skipped it.  I haven't picked a new one yet.

    •  Great points...thanks! (5+ / 0-)

      I have, indeed, yelled at a great many characters.  :)

      This is true of The Lymond Chronicles:

      8. What does the character feel guilty about or ashamed of?  Interesting characters often have one thing that causes them internal pain and creates conflict in their choices.  And often we don't KNOW what that guilt or shame is, but we can tell there is one because the character does such odd or destructive things.  Figuring it out, then, is a mystery to be solved that can take up most of the book.

      There is one or two sentences in the first book that cause Lymond grief about his mother and then in the next books it gets worse until finally I could understand that is what caused so much of the trouble between them.  As the books went on, I yelled at the mother a lot.  If she had only broken her promise to a dead man and told the truth!!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Jan 09, 2013 at 07:08:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  and then there's the case of Oedipus (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Monsieur Georges, cfk, Brecht, Dumbo

      who can't really see anything UNTIL he's blind...or at the very least, he can't stand what's in his sight.

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