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View Diary: NRO: Romney would have won if we had just changed the rules (154 comments)

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  •  4 states could "fix" this (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bobinson, kyril, Matt Z

    4 states with Republican governments controlling all chambers, but who voted for the president:  Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Florida.

    As a note - there is a bill to assign based on congressional district in the Virginia legislature to consider this session.

    The hard-core red states would not pass this - they would still go winner-take all.  So Texas would not give any EV's to the Dem until demographics kick in.  

    The hard-core blue states would not pass this - California, Massachusetts, Illinois.  The split states also wouldn't pass it (New York).  

    This is a real threat - since the Republicans control the entire government in those states there is nothing that the Dems can do to stop it.

    Democrats *do* have a plan for Social Security - it's called Social Security. -- Ed Schultz

    by FredFred on Tue Jan 08, 2013 at 05:47:41 PM PST

    •  Support by State for a National Popular Vote (0+ / 0-)

      A survey of Ohio voters showed 70% overall support for a national popular vote for President.
      By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 81% for a national popular vote among Democrats, 65% among Republicans, and 61% among Others.

      A survey of Pennsylvania voters showed 78% overall support for a national popular vote for President.
      Support was 87% among Democrats, 68% among Republicans, and 76% among independents.

      A survey of Virginia voters showed 74% overall support for a national popular vote for President.
      By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 79% for a national popular vote among liberal Democrats (representing 17% of respondents), 86% among moderate Democrats (representing 21% of respondents), 79% among conservative Democrats (representing 10% of respondents), 76% among liberal Republicans (representing 4% of respondents), 63% among moderate Republicans (representing 14% of respondents), and 54% among conservative Republicans (representing 17% of respondents), and 79% among Others (representing 17% of respondents).

      A survey of Florida voters showed 78% overall support for a national popular vote for President.
      By political affiliation, support for a national popular vote was 88% among Democrats, 68% among Republicans, and 76% among others.

      More than 2,110 state legislators (in 50 states) have sponsored and/or cast recorded votes in favor of the National Popular Vote bill.

      In Gallup polls since 1944, only about 20% of the public has supported the current system of awarding all of a state's electoral votes to the presidential candidate who receives the most votes in each separate state (with 70% opposed and about 10% undecided). Support is strong among Republicans, Democrats, and Independents, as well as every demographic group in virtually every state surveyed in recent polls in recent closely divided Battleground states: CO – 68%, FL – 78%, IA 75%, MI – 73%, MO – 70%, NH – 69%, NV – 72%, NM– 76%, NC – 74%, OH – 70%, PA – 78%, VA – 74%, and WI – 71%; in Small states (3 to 5 electoral votes): AK – 70%, DC – 76%, DE – 75%, ID – 77%, ME – 77%, MT – 72%, NE 74%, NH – 69%, NV – 72%, NM – 76%, OK – 81%, RI – 74%, SD – 71%, UT – 70%, VT – 75%, WV – 81%, and WY – 69%; in Southern and Border states: AR – 80%, KY- 80%, MS – 77%, MO – 70%, NC – 74%, OK – 81%, SC – 71%, TN – 83%, VA – 74%, and WV – 81%; and in other states polled: AZ – 67%, CA – 70%, CT – 74%, MA – 73%, MN – 75%, NY – 79%, OR – 76%, and WA – 77%. Americans believe that the candidate who receives the most votes should win.

      The National Popular Vote bill has passed 31 state legislative chambers, in 21 small, medium-small, medium, and large population states, including one house in Arkansas(6), Connecticut (7), Delaware (3), The District of Columbia, Maine (4), Michigan (16), Nevada (6), New Mexico (5), New York (29), North Carolina (15), and Oregon (7), and both houses in California, Colorado (9), Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island (4), Vermont, and Washington. The bill has been enacted by the District of Columbia (3), Hawaii (4), Illinois (19), New Jersey (14), Maryland (11), California (55), Massachusetts (10), Vermont (3), and Washington (13). These nine jurisdictions have 132 electoral votes -- 49% of the 270 necessary to bring the law into effect.

      NationalPopularVote

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