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View Diary: Homeland Security - Keep Java Disabled in Browsers Despite Java Update (68 comments)

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  •  Okay. So what function does Java actually (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hey338Too

    have vis-a-vis our browsers? As distinct from Java Script.

    And thanks for the previous answer! As well as any future if you're inclined.


    Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

    by Jim P on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 04:18:20 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Java can enable (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jim P, Hey338Too, wilderness voice

      Some very complex things to render in browsers - things like realtime molecular manipulations, rotations, 3-d shading, complex object or data editing, etc etc.

      It's not the kind of thing that affects typicality Internet use. Most people wouldn't miss it, but for those who rely on java functions (large numbers of business critical components run in java within browsers.

      Like any powerful tool, it can and is often misused (out of laziness or ignorance) by developers and companies - used in places where quality HTML and Ajax could do a better job

      Java does have a place, but it's not everywhere.

    •  This is a hard question to answer ... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jim P, Tinfoil Hat

      ... in a forum like this.  I saw a quote when I was looking for a easy, non-technical answer to this question: "Java is to Javascript as Ham is to Hampster".

      This may be the best non-technical answer I could find:

      Java and JavaScript are completely different, and are related only by the inclusion of "Java" in the name.  The inclusion of the "Java" name in "JavaScript" was the result of a co-marketing arrangement between Netscape and Sun Microsystems back when Netscape was a dominant web browser, in exchange for Netscape bundling Java Runtime Environment (JRE) with its browser.

      Java is a programming language designed to run applets in a Java Virtual Machine on any computer/device that supports a Java Virtual Machine.  Java applets generally do not interact with the Web page itself, but usually runs as a "standalone" program embedded in a Web page....

      JavaScript (originally known as "LiveScript") is a scripting language that runs inside of an Internet browser to manipulate and enhance the contents of Web pages. JavaScript is designed to expand the capabilities of a web page so that it behaves more like a program than just a static page of text and images.  (Note: this is from a website for a tool called ParaChat)

      That "Java Virtual Machine (JVM)" is the key difference.  Java can pretty much do whatever a computer can do, JavaScript can only do what the browser allows it to do.

      Please understand that this is a 150,000 foot view.  I hope it helps.

      I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

      by Hey338Too on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 05:09:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thank you. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Hey338Too

        At least I have a feel for the difference.

        Java's realm of action would be the nation of "computer" while Javascript's would be the province of "browser." A province Java might or might not wander into.


        Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

        by Jim P on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 05:16:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Pretty close... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jim P

          ... and don't forget this was at a really high level.  

          One used to be able allow Java to run in that provincial space, but it was supposed to operate under the rules of the province so it couldn't run amok.  There were things Java simply wasn't allowed to do on your computer when it was running in a browser.  Apparently, Oracle has forgotten to enforce some of those rules, so a bad guy can make Java do whatever they want in the province.  That's why this is such a scary event.

          I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

          by Hey338Too on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 05:44:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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