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View Diary: It's been a sh*tty day (129 comments)

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  •  Animals are especially important (13+ / 0-)

    for the elderly.  I suspect the simple fact of having a cat or a dog prevents many suicides among elderly persons who lose their spouses.  And quality time with a tolerant cat or understanding dog can do a whole lot for a person with Alzheimers.

    Anyway, it's normal and right to have that sort of relationship across species.  It has always seemed to me a sort of abuse to deny the very old or the very young the chance to interact with animals, as long as the environment is set up in such a way that everyone is cared for and safe.

    “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” Charles Darwin

    by ivorybill on Wed Jan 16, 2013 at 02:46:16 PM PST

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    •  COMPLETELY. (12+ / 0-)

      I work with a great rescue in the DC Metro area - Seniors for Seniors USA - that places older cats with older people.  I am constantly amazed at how many assisted living facilities have a no pets policy when the scientific evidence of both the physical and emotional benefits (on the human) of having a cat is unarguable.

      •  Agreed. Just think of how greatly both (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KVoimakas
        I am constantly amazed at how many assisted living facilities have a no pets policy when the scientific evidence of both the physical and emotional benefits (on the human) of having a cat is unarguable.
        seniors and senior kitties could be helped and given that chance to love and be loved if not for myopic and ignorant rules.  Not to mention those cats could have forever homes with those folks in a lot of cases too.

        "For all those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die." Ted Kennedy 1980 DNC Keynote Speech

        by Dumas EagerSeton on Thu Jan 17, 2013 at 08:20:39 AM PST

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    •  And even some shelter dogs (6+ / 0-)

      can be trained to help a senior, whether it's alerting someone hard of hearing to a knock on the door or picking up a fallen item so the human doesn't risk falling over when s/he bends down to pick it up.

      "If we ever needed to vote we sure do need to vote now" -- Rev. William Barber, NAACP

      by Cali Scribe on Wed Jan 16, 2013 at 09:37:47 PM PST

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    •  Agreed. My dad has short term memory issues. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KVoimakas
      Animals are especially important for the elderly
      His mom had Alzheimer's and died at age 97 but her last 4-5yrs weren't that great because she didn't remember many people and had a lot of infections (bladder mostly).

      Daddy lives in WI and me in NYC but I'm doing my best to keep a sharp eye on him.  I call him every day, am setting up LifeAlert when I get home at Easter and already am medical proxy and POA for him so I know all that's going on with him.

      He's still very independent: takes care of his bills, drives safely to church, dinners, errands, tends the lawn and plows & shovels in winter, cares for Mitzie, takes his meds and eats regularly.

      I think it helps that he's always been a creature of precise routine.  It also helps that he HAS TO take care of someone besides himself and Mitzie is a good companion. She "wakes" him up in the morning and snoozes with him in his recliner in the afternoon and evenings.  He's always talking to her so that's all good too.

      Mitzie is a blessing, and a special blessing on mom for setting daddy up before she left us.

      Peace,
      DES

      "For all those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die." Ted Kennedy 1980 DNC Keynote Speech

      by Dumas EagerSeton on Thu Jan 17, 2013 at 08:17:38 AM PST

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