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View Diary: SNLC, Vol. CCCLVIII / SN@TO 14: Maria Stuarda Edition (54 comments)

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  •  Maybe I'll try to make the encore. Kicked myself (9+ / 0-)

    a bit when I saw that it had been on today. Of course, Mary Stuart being Roman Catholic had very little to do with her being beheaded. The multiple conspiracies against Elizabeth that used Mary as a focus were the principle reason that Elizabeth finally lost patience and had her beheaded. There were many Roman Catholic lords that survived quite well but had had the good sense not to conspire against their sovreign.



    Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

    by Wee Mama on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 05:06:06 PM PST

    •  given my ignorance of the full history.... (9+ / 0-)

      ....or even part of the history, I did keep in mind that the opera is a pretty one-sided treatment, perhaps reflecting its source material in the Schiller play, but also the general Catholicism of Italy.  One other things about QEI and English Catholics were that two of the major composers of the time, William Byrd and Thomas Tallis, managed to survive with QEI acknowledging their talent.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 08:49:52 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Correct. Some other facts follow (3+ / 0-)

      The reference to "sisters" refers to Elizabeth's view of monarchs as siblings.  Elizabeth called Mary her sister queen, hence she couldn't quite bring herself provide the necessary consequence for Mary's treason.  Sir Francis Walsingham, Elizabeth's head of intelligence, was the force behind the decision to rid England of Mary and her meddling. As long as Mary lived, passionate Catholics intent on Catholic restoration to the English throne, were drawn to her and to plots to get rid of the woman they believed was a usurper.   Mary was neither bright enough nor politically apt enough to avoid becoming entangled in their conspiracies.

      Newt 2012. Sociopath, adulterer, hypocrite, Republican.

      by tikkun on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 02:33:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  A pretty fair summary. I never could quite (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tikkun

        understand the passionate attachment to Mary that some Roman Catholics have, given her feckless private life, but I suppose "martrydom" overcomes a great many shortcomings. Charles the First has a better case for being a religious martyr, as he really did believe that bishops were an essential part of the church and that was one component, if not the only one, that led to his death.



        Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

        by Wee Mama on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 04:41:20 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  late reply #3; good points (0+ / 0-)

        In the opera, it's obviously Cecil who takes the initiative to push for Mary's execution.  Joshua Hopkins took the view in the intermission banter that he played Cecil as a "total patriot", with no personal animus against Mary, but the issue of a Catholic pretender to the throne in Protestant England obviously was a recipe for disaster.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Tue Jan 22, 2013 at 03:37:24 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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