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  •  When I say DC line losses, I am referring to (0+ / 0-)

    I^2R (read I Squared X R) losses.  The conductor has a known  resistance per 1000 meters or per mile, and when current flows in the conductor, voltage is dropped per ohm's law.  And voltage is dropped in the return line because the same current must flow in all parts of the circuit.  Given that I am not fully schooled in high voltage transmission, DC or AC, and likely never will be, I will leave it up to the IEEE to work through these issues and come up with "the real answer".  I'm not confident that this will be found in my lifetime since even with Grounding, that topic has been being fought out for over 120 years, is not fully settled.  A facinating disucssion on this topic can be found in the "Soare's book on grounding", available, if I remember correctly, from the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association).

    Republicans are like alligators. All mouth and no ears.

    by Ohiodem1 on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:15:05 AM PST

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    •  I thought DC was slightly more efficient (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ohiodem1

      because there is no skin effect like you have in AC. Same I^2R losses.

      But, again, I'm not a high voltage guy.

      Javelin, Jockey details, all posts, discontinue

      by jam on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:30:44 AM PST

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      •  It is. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ohiodem1

        And there's a number of other factors that make DC more efficient, too.  There's only one case where AC wins out on (ionization of the air around the wires), but it's a relatively small effect overall.

    •  I read it on Wikipedia, it must be true (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ohiodem1
      Even though HVDC conversion equipment at the terminal stations is costly, overall savings in capital cost may arise because of significantly reduced transmission line costs over long distance routes. HVDC needs fewer conductors than an AC line, as there is no need to support three phases. Also, thinner conductors can be used since HVDC does not suffer from the skin effect. These factors can lead to large reductions in transmission line cost for a long distance HVDC scheme.

      Javelin, Jockey details, all posts, discontinue

      by jam on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:34:53 AM PST

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