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View Diary: The Moral Realities of Self Defense Shootings (238 comments)

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  •  And therein lies the rub (6+ / 0-)

    That's the biggest issue.    We have no idea in that situation what really happened, and the only way we'd know is if someone was alive.

    That's the part that gets to me.  I don't pretend to know the answers for everyone, just myself.   But reading the discussion here I am glad of those who can talk seriously about the real difficulties of killing someone, or defending yourself.

    Meanwhile, I look at my facebook feed today and it's full of pictures and rah-rah stories of someone shooting someone else.   I am always glad to hear from people, even those I disagree with who can value the difficulty of this decision and lose the "rah-rah" nature that has been adopted.

    Thank you for your comment.

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 12:25:34 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  I don't see any reason to not be happy... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Baculum King

      that innocent people successfully defended themselves.

      Anything else appears rather distasteful to me.

      •  This is too simple (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Kevskos, salamanderempress, splashy

        I am of course glad that they have survived and are OK.   But realize, the people bragging about these stories is not the person who saved their own life.  Instead, it's people who post their pictures and stories with comments like "HELL YEAH!" and "Right On!", and that's the part that does make me sad.

        What has happened to that person, even the one that has saved their own life is a complex and very personal moment that has a lot of strings attached to it.  

        Boiling it all down to "hell yeah! kick ass!" and similar takes someone else's anguish and turns it into a coined phrase.  It takes someone's death and makes a mockery of it.  

        Whether the person who was killed was a terrible, horrible person or not, they were still a  human being who is dead.  And the emotion a lot of people feel is far more complex then punchlines.

        I don't mind that people are OK.  I just want to think a bit about the reality of what happens to everyone involved, and to realize it's not as simple as the rah-rah.  It's OK if you disagree with me.  I can respect that.

        Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

        by Chris Reeves on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 09:38:55 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think you may well be vastly oversimplifying.... (0+ / 0-)

          peoples reaction.  A hearty "hell yeah" could be, simultaineously, an expression of congratulations, relief, and joy, encompassing many aspects.

          Language is complicated and layered.  This doesn't always translate well across the cold messenger of the internet.

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