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  •  Liberal arts is an AWFUL major today (7+ / 0-)

    Certainly medicine, engineering, etc are prone to automation and outsourcing as well, but liberal arts you are starting out redundant, unless you are going to win the lottery ticket of being successful in a creative field.

    25 years ago you could walk into a business and work your way to the top with any college degree. Not today, there is no 'mail room' (all robots).

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 03:01:37 PM PST

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    •  OTOH, since getting any job (19+ / 0-)

      is practically hopeless, spending four years learning about French literature or Greek philosophy makes a lot of sense.  

    •  Frankly, I'd rather have a liberal arts degree in (17+ / 0-)

      something I love knowing about, than have a degree that "guarantees" a job in an endeavor I hate.  I know something about that, having a few years of doing the latter.  

      When you have a love for an area of interest, there are all sorts of ways you might think of to earn money which you enjoy.  Dreading your job is a lifetime of punishment.

      "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

      by YucatanMan on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 08:33:26 PM PST

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      •  Re (6+ / 0-)
        When you have a love for an area of interest, there are all sorts of ways you might think of to earn money which you enjoy.  Dreading your job is a lifetime of punishment.
        And yet even so, many liberal arts majors can't make ends meet and have turned their love of English into working at Starbucks (or not working at all). A lot of liberal arts people simply haven't found a way to make money doing what they love.

        I totally get what you are saying here, but a lot of liberal arts majors hate their jobs (or lack thereof) anyway. So you can hate your job and be poor, or hate your job and not be poor.

        I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm sure there are tons of examples of successes in this area. But running the numbers...?

        (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
        Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

        by Sparhawk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 08:52:36 PM PST

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        •  I know what you are saying, but at least you'll (10+ / 0-)

          be educated in something you enjoy, and have a chance to turn that into something else, creatively.

          If you are educated in ... say, accounting, and you love history or literature, then ... well, that's it.

          If you hate your job, and are poor, but are writing a great American novel on the side or painting or teaching an evening class in local history, you're at least partially happy, rather than just accounting, accounting, and accounting.

          (note, you'd never guess I couldn't tolerate a single accounting class all through college, could you?  Took me an extra year just because of that, in spite of having a good aptitude for higher math. Just not... accounting.)  :-)

          "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

          by YucatanMan on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 09:32:59 PM PST

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          •  Due to automation, acountants (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            foresterbob, badger

            have very low salaries.

          •  My area of study was anthropology and linguistics (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            badger

            and I loved every minute of college.  But of course, out of necessity, I work as a registered nurse.  My job has given my family stability, and I know that my work has value.  But, if I won the lottery, I would love to live the life of an academic, traveling to exotic places, learning to speak to villagers in remote areas. I know that my college degree in liberal arts did not yield one penny in salary payback. But I would do it again in a second. It was probably my favorite years of my life, and the experience enriched every year afterwards.

            I can't imagine if the only education I ever had was how to write a nursing care plan, and suction tracheostomies, and read EKG's.  I would never discourage someone who wants to study liberal arts, as long as they are realistic.

            We have nowhere else to go... this is all we have. (Margaret Mead)

            by bruised toes on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:29:42 AM PST

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            •  Bravo (0+ / 0-)

              My kid and I agree.

              And my sister-in-law and an ex-girlfriend are nurses, so I respect that, too.

              I wanted to be an engineer, was, and never regretted it, but it's the same as what you wrote - just that I got to do it for pay for a while. The pay is nice, but to be able to do what fascinates you at all, or even to learn about it, is the real reward. Life goes far beyond economics.

              Modern revolutions have succeeded because of solidarity, not force.

              by badger on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:41:10 AM PST

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