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View Diary: Landlord trying to evict family, refuses to provide heat (119 comments)

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  •  Nope not necesarily true. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ManhattanMan

    In a city with a strong Tenant's Rights Association and good tenant's rights laws, it can work this way:

    1. Call for housing inspection, and get an order of repair. No heat is a major violation, by the way, and could result in fine or jailing of landlord.

    2. Notify landlord that rent will be withheld (no legal need to put into escrow, by the way), and wait for landlord to file for whatever landlord wants to file. If harassed in the mean time, call the police, show them your papers.

    3. Counter file, suing for rent abatement.

    4. Win in court.

    I've done this myself in a city in MN, and have helped others to win also. One of these slumlord's ended up owing the tenant money, and still couldn't evict the tenant.

    The idea that a tenant without heat should pay rent is simply ridiculous.

    The landlord should be in jail, pay a massive fine, and owe the tenant money, not the other way around.

    PS Never have had a problem renting after that fight either.

    Tenants are full human beings, not dogs to be kept in heatless houses. At least dogs are not expected to pay to stay in a heatless house. And the Humane Society would intervene if the dog were kept in a freezing heatless house. Perhaps we need a humane society for tenants.

    WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Jan: USW Local Mourns Fallen Brother

    by JayRaye on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 07:57:03 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Usually the ULD if filed before the tenants (0+ / 0-)

      take the actions you suggest. ULD actions start a train that is hard to stop. Unlawful detainer actions operate under expedited rules. if a pay-or-vacate notice is legally posted/served, it is very hard to stop the eviction without paying all the rent that is due.

      But as you suggest the law varies widely especially among cities where local ordinances may provide greater renter rights than state laws.

      In MN I can imagine failing to provide heat in the winter is an extreme major violation. Not the same everywhere else.

      Though often making a formal safety/health complaint before the ULD is filed can prevent an eviction for 60-90 days (based on the policy to discourage retaliatory evictions).

      I guess my point is that contrary to popular opinion/conventional wisdom in most jurisdictions it is fast and easy for landlord to evict tenants -- especially if the rent is unpaid.

      •  And my point is still that tenants are human (0+ / 0-)

        beings not dogs.

        If we want justice for people, that's what we fight for.
        And that is the point of this diary, to put the pressure on for justice for this family.

        You seem to think that the law only applies to tenants and tenants duties. The law also applies to the landlord and the landlords duties.

        WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Jan: USW Local Mourns Fallen Brother

        by JayRaye on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 08:41:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  And a lawyer who stands with poor people, (0+ / 0-)

          should fight to make sure that poor people's rights to live are, at the very least, equal to the property rights of rich people.

          WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Jan: USW Local Mourns Fallen Brother

          by JayRaye on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 08:45:00 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  You are right, of course, but we need to (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ManhattanMan

          avoid promoting the general falsehood that it is difficult for a landlord to evict a tenant.

          In many juridictions, if rent is not paid it is very easy and fast to evict a tenant.

          I defended a few ULD respondents pro-bono. Here, it is practically impossible to stop the eviction if the pay-or-vacate was valid and the time had elapsed. But, occasionally I was able to convince courts not to levy financial judgments for back rent and attorneys fees, but they would still issue an eviction order.

           

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