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View Diary: 'We're all living longer'? No, we're not. (174 comments)

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  •  The data I was looking at is (1+ / 0-)
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    Eyesbright

    Table III of

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...

    According to that paper, there has been almost no change in high school graduation rates between the cohort born in 1961-1965 (77.9% completed HS) and the cohort born in 1976-1980 (77.1% completed HS).

    The chart you link to shows the percent of over 25 year-olds with 4 years of high school.  You cannot infer high school graduation or drop out rates directly from that data.  I think that what it most likely represents is that the cohort with the lowest high school graduation rate--the generation that reached majority in the 1920s and 1930s--is dying off (and, potentially reinforced if the less-educated in that cohort are dying sooner than more-educated).

    "Well, I'm sure I'd feel much worse if I weren't under such heavy sedation..."--David St. Hubbins

    by Old Left Good Left on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 02:59:58 PM PST

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    •  As you say (0+ / 0-)

      "the cohort with the lowest high school graduation rate--the generation that reached majority in the 1920s and 1930s--is dying off ". That's right. Most of the mortality stats are contributed by older cohorts. The ones contributing to the 1990 data had a lot more non-grads than the ones contributing to the recent data. Hence the comparison was between very different slices of those cohorts at the two times. The graduation rate at the time of the data isn't important because those cohorts are contributing very little to the mortality stats.

      Michael Weissman UID 197542

      by docmidwest on Wed Jan 30, 2013 at 07:25:58 AM PST

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