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View Diary: Source of NRA policy found (82 comments)

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  •  I don't think his intention was to mock (9+ / 0-)

    Archie is a character out of the Commedia tradition. We are supposed to identify with him as much as be reviled by him, to celebrate his inevitable comeuppance while sympathizing with his humiliations.

    It was a very forthright show in it's day. And it was as much a critique on the casual radicalism of suburban hippie-dom as it was on blue collar racists.

    What was most interesting was what the creators chose to do with the show once they had the attention of the world. I think Jean Stapleton at the time was the most important feminist figure in the culture. Her influence went miles behind any of the self-identified feminist activists, which is no slight against them - they simply didn't have the captive audience that Norman Lear had developed. The episode dealing with Edith's rape is a dramatic achievement that has probably never been matched.

    •  You make good points. (1+ / 0-)
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      PSzymeczek
      And it was as much a critique on the casual radicalism of suburban hippie-dom as it was on blue collar racists.
      I think a lot of people miss that; I know I did when I watched the show as a young teen.  I saw Archie as the bad guy and Mike as the good guy.  Watching reruns years later, I saw that Mike was, in many ways, just as bad as Archie.  

      And I agree that Edith was a much more important character than it seemed at the time.  To me, she may be the only really admirable character on the show.

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