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View Diary: Update on GMB02's Health Crisis: Hope--and Change (304 comments)

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  •  I used to be very sensitive to those hours. (29+ / 0-)

    Would do assessments and vitals on the early birds and then check back on the last hours of twilight sleepers to allow them all the winks they could get.

    In addition to the professional experience, I had a very definitive personal one. My first, dearly anticipated and beloved infant went from the 50th percentile in length at birth, to 95th at 2 months. I could set my watch by his 2 hour feeding schedule. At about six weeks I told my hubby, 'The bottles of expressed milk are in the fridge, if you don't get to him before I do, You will be dead.'  Four hours of uninterrupted sleep (hubby did really well ;)  Unbelievable how much more energy I had the next day, and how much better my brain was working.

    The drugs you get in critical care mess with both sleep and cognitive function. Especially the multiple IV antibiotic regimens. Getting out of that bed as soon as possible is really important, it takes energy. Same with walking.

    "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

    by Ginny in CO on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 08:13:44 PM PST

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    •  your patients were lucky (19+ / 0-)

      to have such a thoughtful nurse.

      Attention to mitigating the difficulty of getting sleep in the hospital is one of the best things I've ever heard. It should be taught is every nursing school!

      The experiences I've had in the hospital were made so much better by good nurses. Nurses are what make the hospital run, IMO.

      •  Funny, this was a message management (18+ / 0-)

        could never get.

        Nurses are what make the hospital run, IMO.

        I spent a few decades trying to get anyone to realize:
        Your business revenue depends on your most important service: nursing care. All the rest is support.
        Those that employ doctors (community, university, some private) also sell their services. Most practice and bill independently. Except for a few specialties, they all have to have nurses to do their jobs.

        I have told countless patients: "Never come to a hospital for food or rest." I firmly believe humor is the best medicine. And I have to admit, the new menu based food services are actually good.

        Sleep promotion is taught in nursing school and the hospitals are doing stuff beyond the standard sleep meds. I've taken many patients a cuppa chamomile tea around 22:00. The doctors are the ones who can't adjust their schedules. Admissions are done around the clock, rounds and discharges can be at very bizarre hours. I really loved it when a doc would tell the patient and family s/he would be rounding at 7 am the next day. Everyone is there by 6:50. No doc. He's tied up. Hours go by and the group all get drowsy.  Yeah, that's when Doc walks in...

        I always felt lucky to have such a rewarding job. (Not financially...) It totally reinforces that the very vast majority of humans are decent people, warts and all. I could go to work tired, down, pissed, etc. By the time I got through the first assessment, it would all vanish.

        "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

        by Ginny in CO on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:52:26 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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