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View Diary: Obama administration issues rules for individual mandate, America continues to exist (94 comments)

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  •  Yeah, but I'm pretty sure that you'd be hit with (0+ / 0-)

    huge costs if something happens.   Say you fall off your roof, or get shot on the street, or develop diabetes.....   sure, the insurance company can't deny coverage, but if you don't have insurance at the time of your accident, then the hospitals and doctors  ARE allowed to charge you for services that you need to keep you alive if you present to a hospital emergency room.   HUGE costs.  And then, if you need ongoing  care, they'll either charge you market rates for medical services, or offer to sell you a policy with a level of premiums to make up for the fact that you weren't sharing the risk with the rest of us while you had no coverage.

    •  oddly enough, that is precisely the same situation (0+ / 0-)

      I've been in for nearly all of my adult life.

      There will inevitably be changes in ACA, though, for the simple reason that ACA does not actually provide any access to a doctor for people who actually need it.  All ACA does is provide catastrophic coverage, mostly to people who don't need it because they don't have any assets to protect. As far as actual medical access, all ACA subsidies do is pay for high-deductible shit policies which guarantee that poor people still can't afford to see a doctor when they need to.

      That will have to be dealt with.

      Soon.

      •  Well, that's "half right," LOL! (0+ / 0-)

        Definitely can't argue with this statement:  As far as actual medical access, all ACA subsidies do is pay for high-deductible shit policies which guarantee that poor people still can't afford to see a doctor when they need to."

        But don't forget, it is beneficial to more affluent folks, small business owners, etc., for whom a "high deductible" policy (set up with a health savings account) is quite sufficient.  For many of them, the premiums may not be a steal, but they'll probably be lower than than could find in the private individual insurance market.

        I do know a little about this, since I come from a huge family of insurance and securities brokers, although I'm not personally 'in th biz.'  :-)

        Mollie

        “If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

        by musiccitymollie on Wed Jan 30, 2013 at 05:56:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  regarding this: (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie, BusyinCA
          But don't forget, it is beneficial to more affluent folks, small business owners, etc., for whom a "high deductible" policy (set up with a health savings account) is quite sufficient.  For many of them, the premiums may not be a steal, but they'll probably be lower than than could find in the private individual insurance market.
          that is indeed the viewpoint that many people here at DKos look at it through, since many of the people here are themselves upper-middle class, more affluent folks. Me, I've been dirt-poor for nearly my entire life (the highest wage I ever got was eight bucks an hour and I never had benefits of any sort, not even paid sick days), and even though I was fortunate enough to claw my way out of it, I still view the world through that lens. So it really really annoyed me when, back during the "kill the bill" pie fight, many people here were arguing that we needed ACA to protect people from losing their house or retirement savings because of a medical emergency.  Many Kossacks were (and many still are, probably) utterly oblivious to the fact that most people in the US don't even HAVE any retirement savings and don't own a home, so they have no assets to lose or to protect, and forced catastrophic insurance does absolutely nothing for them. It doesn't even let them see a doctor when they need to.

          So for the non-affluent, the ACA does nothing.  Nothing at all whatsoever.

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