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View Diary: Online campaign launches to make Apple products in Illinois (18 comments)

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  •  Yup, "Cute" (0+ / 0-)

    IL chart

    Gee, notice the Corporate Tax ranking among others?

    2013 State Business Tax Climate Index

    Apple?  Dream on.

    "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

    by EdMass on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 09:46:27 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  That's a different argument. (0+ / 0-)

      As you probably know, groups like the one you're linking have a specific right-wing agenda in how they define "business friendly." As much as I dislike it, the actual effective tax rate for most Illinois businesses is much lower once enterprise zones and other incentives are accounted for. That chart is irrelevant to Apple.

      Incentives for tech development, excellent transportation infrastructure for manufacturing, a well educated workforce, world-leading technology research institutions, and high quality of life in a world class city like Chicago are more relevant to a company like Apple.

      •  Oops... (0+ / 0-)
        high quality of life in a world class city like Chicago
        The Nation’s Most Segregated City
        So, why hasn’t Chicago replicated New York’s success? I believe the answer lies in economic segregation. Chicago is the most racially segregated big city in America, and among the most economically segregated. Harvard sociologist Robert Sampson has written extensively about cumulative disadvantage, which is the idea that all sorts of health and economic problems tend to cluster in places that are segregated by race. Structural features of those places — poverty, density, isolation — put them at great risk of higher rates of crime and violence. Reducing those risks leads to safer cities.

        Crime policy has long been primarily about security and control of these segregated places. But the United States has never been able to arrest its way out of its crime problem. A much better strategy is to unleash market forces through tax credits enticing businesses to move into non-traditional business districts, taxing blighted properties at draconian rates, and changing zoning laws to promote gentrification (but encourage poorer residents to stay). In short, our policy should be to actively juxtapose prosperity with poverty to vaccinate the crime-infected places and stop the epidemic. In the short-term, this strategy will cost a lot in dollars and political capital, but in the long-term, it is the most promising means of reducing violence and de-segregating neighborhoods.

        But that's a "different argument".

        Statistics are just statistics and are wingless when they enter the biz dev sections of corporations for evaluation of potential investment and expansion.  Your position that Illinois can, from a P.R. perspective, compartmentalize its way out of addressing its overall issues and don't affect how any business evaluates presence or investment in the State denies reality of how business functions.

        I wish you well in moving toward resolution.  Heck, even CA managed to pass a balanced budget.

        "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

        by EdMass on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 11:20:27 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Interesting qoute (0+ / 0-)

          "A much better strategy is to unleash market forces through tax credits enticing businesses to move into non-traditional business districts, taxing blighted properties at draconian rates, and changing zoning laws to promote gentrification (but encourage poorer residents to stay)"

          This is being promoted by a State Representative from a majority black district on Chicago's west side. Perhaps that quote is exactly what he has in mind by enticing Apple to manufacture products in Chicago.

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