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View Diary: I am overweight, so I can't have that job because I might die? (383 comments)

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  •  It's not that he's overweight. (9+ / 0-)

    It's that when some random person points that out, he flips out.  Imagine if any president felt that they had to call everybody who says something bad about them on the phone at their house to personally berate them.  They wouldn't have time to do anything else.

    The story wasn't a story until Christie made it a story.  It's a story about his thin skin, not his thick waste.

    Just my 2 cents.

    •  he didn't flip out (8+ / 0-)

      anymore than a black person "flips out" when someone says that they shouldn't marry a white person, cause their kids won't belong

      and it was an ex white house doctor who was saying that he shouldn't be president cause he might die from being so fat

      he didn't just speak up for himself.  he spoke up for every overweight person who's been passed over for a job because they are overweight.

      Wouldn't you like to be a pepper too?

      by AntonBursch on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 10:30:36 PM PST

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      •  I've agreed with you every step of the way... (9+ / 0-)

        ...until there.

        If the WH doc is to be believed, he did flip out on her. He called her at home to berate and belittle her. That's not speaking up for himself, that's attacking her. He didn't want to hear from her to know if her comments might have been misunderstood... he wanted to make her feel his wrath.

        What he said on TV prior to that was speaking up for those of us who are/were overweight. But then he flipped out in private.

        No, you can't fix stupid. You OUTNUMBER stupid. -Wildthumb, 1/10/2013

        by newinfluence on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 12:28:08 AM PST

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        •  so the doc is blameless (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JesseCW, Avilyn

          Christie must be responsible but doctors get carte blanche to say whatever they want

          Blake: I am an enemy of the Federation but it is corrupt and oppressive. I will destroy it if I can

          by GideonAB on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:37:17 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  A doctor saying someone has a health problem... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            indie17, CS in AZ, TrueBlueMajority

            ...is equivalent to that person calling the doctor at homee and raging/cursing? Oh that irresponsible doctor for answering a direct question by saying that Christie's weight is a concern if he runs for president.

            And no, no one should make fat jokes or diss people who are overweight. Many are guilty of such things, but I'm bemused why the doctor is being accused of that.

            •  Obama (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              JesseCW, DarkLadyNyara

              has a health problem. He is an ex-smoker. Yet no one wants him to step down.

              Doctors can preach all they want but it does not actually address health problems.

              A list is not a solution

              Blake: I am an enemy of the Federation but it is corrupt and oppressive. I will destroy it if I can

              by GideonAB on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 06:28:06 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Being a doctor makes it worse (6+ / 0-)

              Doctors are held to higher standards than some random person slamming the celebrity-du-jour or bashing some politician they don't like..  We live in a big country with all kinds of people in it that may say all sorts of stupid things and have stupid reasons for doing so.

              If you are a doctor, especially in a position where you've worked at the white house, you don't go around making useless diagnoses of people you have never examined.  It would be ethically questionable to do that in private, much less make a public statement like that.  I'm surprised that doctor isn't receiving a sternly worded letter from the AMA.

              The doctor/patient relationship is private, and people not involved in it should keep their traps shut.

              If this guy is actually a candidate for president in 3 years, then maybe his health becomes a valid topic, to be discussed factually and sensitively at that time.  But he's not president, there's no election even on the horizon, not a primary in sight, and I question this doctor's ethics.  I would never see such a doctor after being witness to such a display of poor judgement.  And if a doctor ever did this to me, you beet I'd call them at home and tell them to mind their own fucking business.

              •  delusion (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Avilyn, rivercard

                It is the delusion that gets me.

                Doctors feel that losing weight is straightforward and no amount of actual evidence against this shakes the belief.

                Imagine if they did that for cancer?

                Blake: I am an enemy of the Federation but it is corrupt and oppressive. I will destroy it if I can

                by GideonAB on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 08:20:42 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  The fact that Christie is morbidly obese is not a (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Joe Bob

                'diagnosis' and I do not understand why people keep saying that, or the complaints that this doctor committed some horrible breach of medical ethics here by stating the obvious and dispensing completely standard medical advice: being morbidly obese is a health risk! Does anyone really expect any doctor to NOT say that, in response to being asked about the health risks of a 400-pound person?

                The doctor was asked the question, in her capacity as a former white house physician who is responsible for the health of the President -- and let's not forget that the reason she was asked that question in the first place was in response to Christie going on TV, on David Letterman, and eating a donut, mocking the very idea that this much extra weight is even a problem. Does anyone really expect he can do that and not have anyone comment that his behavior is unhealthy? Or ask the obvious question about the risks to a potential president? You keep pretending Christie is not a politician with his hat in the ring -- that is also ridiculous, it is clear he is one of their main contenders at least. And he is currently a Governor. The health and personal health habits of national-stage politicians is always fair game. Christie doesn't get a pass because he is overweight.

                If he went on Letterman and lit up a cigarette and laughed at the idea of lung cancer, then someone asks a doctor what they think of his smoking -- would it be an inappropriate "diagnosis" to respond that being a smoker is a health risk? And that flaunting it is bad behavior for an elected official and potential president?

                It is currently considered a medical fact that weighing 400 pounds is a serious health problem with high risk of early death. Every doctor says that to and about every person who is extremely overweight. This is not a diagnosis, it is dispensing the common wisdom of the current medical thinking on risk factors. For her to say anything other than exactly what she said would have been considered medially unethical in today's world.

                This diary is also not correct in the assumption that anyone who is not outraged on Christie's behalf over this incident must not know or have the experience of being discriminated against and struggled with extra weight and obesity, and known the pain and unfairness in the way people think of you because of it -- wrong! I have been there, done that all of my adult life.

                I have read so many studies and proof of the discrimination, in jobs, in promotions, in social situations. And I have lived it all my life too and seen how things change depending on my weight ups and downs. My husband and I were once excluded from a wine tasting group that was started up by a friend-of-a-friend acquaintance, and I was told in confidence by another friend that the reason was the hostess was "fat phobic" because her mother had been extremely obese, and me simply being there made her uncomfortable. Please do not tell me I don't know what it's like to feel the sting of the hatred of fat and fat people. I know it intimately. And I think the current "war on obesity" going on in this country is making it worse than ever.

                But the fact remains that current medical science has determined that being extremely obese, as Chris Christie is, is a severe health problem, and a serious one, not something to be mocked and ignored.

                And it also remains a fact that Christie is in the running for the republican nomination right now, and therefore his particular health issues and his behavior are public issues, open for discussion. This is not just go away, no matter how miffed anyone gets about it.

                I read the front page article too and did not in any way take it to mean that no one who is fat should have a job... that is taking it way too personally, but it's true that any person who weighs 400 pounds or more is going to have a struggle getting and keeping a job. Fair or not, it's reality in any job that involves getting out of your house.

                I never got anywhere close to that weight -- but I was 100 pounds overweight at one time, and I know how much being even that far into the obese category effects every aspect of your life. Pretending it doesn't is silly in my view. I have painstakingly removed about 75 of those pounds now, and I'm a lot healthier for it and can do a lot more than I could then. The pressure and shaming of the anti-obesity campaign and knowledge that I would be subject to medical discrimination in the event of seeing a doctor, or if I ever had any actual health problems, kept me from even going to a doctor, ever, because I knew what they would say.
                And what they would think of me. No maybe it's not fair but let's not pretend this particular doctor did something out of line with today's medical establishment.

                Of course Chris Christie will hear that his weight is a health risk for POTUS. He should expect that. Anyone who is in the running for a high-profile job like POTUS must expect everything about them to be scrutinized and commented upon. It's not necessary to take that  personally or attack this doctor for dispensing standard medical commentary on the health risks of obesity.

                •  If I were a nationally known doctor (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  ladybug53, schnecke21

                  and someone asked me a health-related question about an individual I'd never examined

                  The doctor was asked the question, in her capacity as a former white house physician who is responsible for the health of the President
                  I'd say I wasn't qualified to speak about the health of a person I'd never examined, and if I HAD examined them, I certainly wouldn't do so without their permission!

                  That's the ethical response.  What's so hard about that?

                  The fact that Christie is morbidly obese is not a 'diagnosis'
                  What about speculating about his chances of dropping dead?  Is that a diagnosis?
                  And it also remains a fact that Christie is in the running for the republican nomination right now
                  Oh, are the Republicans nominating a presidential candidate now?  Where are the primaries being held and what's the schedule for the debates?  I'd hate to miss any of it.
                  •  Once again, it is not necessary to examine him (3+ / 0-)

                    to see that he is morbidly obese. And the health risks of carrying that much extra fat are well known to every doctor.  

                    If you were a doctor and someone asked you about the health risks of an individual you have never met who smokes three packs a day, would you need to examine them personally to say that behavior is a health risk? Would you refuse to answer that smoking is dangerous, on ethical grounds?

                    No, of course not. Because that would be ridiculous. Risk factors do not require individual examination -- that's the whole point of statistical risk factors. And weighing 400 pounds, and eating donuts on a national TV show to demonstrate how much you don't care, is unhealthy and deserves to be called out. And your insistence that Christie is not a national politician who has made it known he is interested in the presidency is just silly too.

                    •  Yes! (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      ladybug53, schnecke21

                      I WOULD need to examine them personally, (and get their permission) to tell people anything at all about that person's health.

                      If you were a doctor and someone asked you about the health risks of an individual you have never met who smokes three packs a day, would you need to examine them personally to say that behavior is a health risk? Would you refuse to answer that smoking is dangerous, on ethical grounds?
                      If someone asked me about someone else's health, I'd tell them to mind their own damn business.  This is NOT the equivalent of someone asking me if bad habits are generally a cause of bad health.

                      What is so hard to understand about the fact that doctors should not say anything about any individual's health unless they've examined them and have permission?  Jeebus Krispies.

                      Thee key phrase in your quote is "an individual".  Doctors say things all the time about the health risks of smoking and obesity, and they should continue to do so, and I expect they will.  However they should not speak about individuals, and they certainly shouldn't predict they'll drop dead.  It's unethical, and I have no idea why some of the commenters here think it serves any purpose at all.

                      What rock do you have to be hiding under to not know being obese is a health risk, or smoking, or drinking too much or participating in extreme sports for that matter?  What practical good does it do to breach your professional ethics, point your finger at someone and say "he's fat and he might drop dead?

                      It's a trashy, cheap way to behave.  It's the "National Enquirer" approach to politics,  and we should be better than this.  It's not surprising that doctor behaved badly, as she claims to support Christie, and conservatives are not known for polite, ethical, intelligent politics.  But can we progressives, liberals, and Democrats try not to get drawn into this behavior?  I don't want to be the party of Stupid.

        •  She attacked him on television making his wieght (7+ / 0-)

          an issue as she tried to profiteer from her time as white house doctor.

          She went on to say what the network desired, in return for cash.  

          When you profiteer from someone elses disability, there's a good chance they're going to get mad.

          "Oh, teacher!! Teacher!!  I was calling this fat kid a fatty, and he sniffly YELLLED at me!! He's a bully!"

          "I have often seen people uncivil by too much civility, and tiresome in their courtesy." Michel de Montaigne

          by JesseCW on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 07:12:17 AM PST

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      •  he did flip out (0+ / 0-)

        equating this with

        anymore than a black person "flips out" when someone says that they shouldn't marry a white person, cause their kids won't belong
        is... really strange and I don't get it.

        Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
        Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

        by TrueBlueMajority on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 09:07:41 AM PST

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      •  Excuse me? He called her up at home. (0+ / 0-)

        Called her at home. To yell. And let's not forget that he's a pretty powerful man here, who was using this harassing, intimidating tactic on a woman. The press conference was totally fair game, but calling her at home frankly toes the line of legality, and goes way over the boundaries of civilized behavior.

    •  mmm, Letterman. (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, lorzie, kyril, flowerfarmer, Sychotic1

      I saw him on Letterman the other night and he didn't "flip out" at all, despite Dave asking him over and over (and over!) about his weight in different ways. Including asking if he was currently on a diet, if his wife nagged him about going on a diet, etc. It seemed to go on forever and was quite awkward. I think he was ready with the donut to sort of embrace the fat jokes he knew were inevitable.

      "Watch what you say or they'll be calling you a radical, a liberal, fanatical, criminal..."-7.75, -5.54

      by solesse413 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 10:53:02 PM PST

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    •  If that's your problem with him, that's ok. (10+ / 0-)

      But that's not what the front page piece this diary is responding to was mostly about.

      It was about making fun of the fat kid.

      This game of prodding and poking the fat kid trying to get a reaction, then pointing and laughing and saying "look at the crazy angry fat guy"?

      Yeah, that's fucked up playground bullying.

      "I have often seen people uncivil by too much civility, and tiresome in their courtesy." Michel de Montaigne

      by JesseCW on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 07:10:01 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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