Skip to main content

View Diary: There's one foolproof plan to avoid the looming budget sequester: repeal it (66 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Respectfully, this document has nothing to do (0+ / 0-)

    with the subject that I'm discussing.  

    Since you didn't "point out what you believe is pertinent in this document," I'll venture to guess that you may mean this:

    Section 255 contains a list of programs and activities that are exempt from sequestration.

    • Social Security benefits (old-age, survivors, and disability) and Tier 1 Railroad Retirement benefits.

    • All programs administered by the VA, and special benefits for certain World War II veterans. . . .

    This list has nothing to do with my point.

    I am aware that the social insurance programs were not written into the "sequester" legislation.

    That is a given.  Had they been, Social Security and Medicare could not have been used as pawns, or bargaining chips "to avoid sequestration."

    I'm not sure how much more direct that I can be.

    Here's the bottom line:  If there was a true desire to ensure that our social insurance program remain intact, the sequester would be appealed.  But the Administration in a formal Press Conference, took that possibility "off-the-table."

    Now, that obviously gives the Republicans the "upper-hand" in demanding that entitlements be cut, in exchange for the tax revenue that the Administration desires.

    Between that explanation, and the scores of references in the Mainstream Media regarding the Administration's willingness to put entitlements "on-the-table," I can't offer any more proof.

    The brief that you cite, simply explains that the programs in the list are not a part of the sequestration package.  

    No where does it say that the Administration cannot "bargain with" these programs, in order to stop sequestration.

    Get back to me, if you can point that out, LOL!  But, seriously, pretty sure that won't happen.  

    That's what this entire "Kabuki Theather" is all about.  It's to set up the excuse ("hostage taking") that the Administration "had no choice" but to cut Social Security and Medicare if they wanted more revenue.

    And yet, we all know that they could have let all the Bush tax cuts expired (and then reinstated the middle-class tax cuts), if there sole purpose had been to raise tax revenues.

    It looks like we'll just have to 'agree to disagree' on this one.  :-)  But thanks for the discussion.

    Mollie

    "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

    "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

    by musiccitymollie on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 01:22:32 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  You need to understand how negotiations work. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      musiccitymollie

      Basically, each side has goals they wish to achieve and trade concessions in order to achieve their goals.

      Look a little more carefully at that document and try to understand it in the context of negotiations:

      Social Security is off the table.
      Medicare is scarcely touched.
      In fact, things like Medicaid, housing assistance, lots of stuff directly related to caring for the needy are untouched.

      Non-defense programs are cut by a smaller amount than defense programs.

      In other words, after the sequester, Democrats have a stronger hand than Republicans. They can offer very generous concessions fro defense programs in exchange for maintaining or even increasing current non-defense programs.

      Seriously, Republicans are badly screwed by sequester if Democrats will simply have the courage and intelligence to play their hand properly.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 02:20:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hey, I appreciate your response, but I give up (0+ / 0-)

        trying to explain what I'm saying.

        As as far as "understanding how negotiations work"--I understand quite well.  

        As I've mentioned to coffeetalk, I have over 20 years with the DOD, and budgeting was a part of my duties as the Administrator over the entire branch of Army Community Services.  I believe that I understand very well what is going on, and why.

        I believe that you view this process not from the budgetary standpoint (as I do), but from a political strategic or tactical standpoint.  And I believe that's why we aren't communicating effectively, LOL!

        But, that okay.  As I've said, we can just "agree to disagree."

        I actually hope you're right.  But I am convinced that most of the Bowles-Simpson recommendations will be implemented, including the several recommendations to cut Social Security.

        If I am wrong, and if this has not happened by the end of the President's second term, I'll be more than happy "to eat crow."  And I'll even find you! :-)

        Mollie

        "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

        "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

        by musiccitymollie on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 02:52:52 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I hope I'm right, too. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie

          This is the best chance we've had in years to actually put a dent in defense spending, which, as you know, is very well protected by a web of interlocking contracts that give every person in Congress a vested interest in, at the very least, preserving it.

          But you're right, too.  Nothing guarantees that the hand will be played properly.  It will take a little bit of courage and a little bit of skill.  Makes me long for Bill Clinton, frankly.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 04:36:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site