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View Diary: R&BLers: MY FAVORITE AUTHORS: Books that shape us, books that make us who we are! Aesop's Fables (76 comments)

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  •  name ? dunno... (11+ / 0-)

    crow
    stones
    drink water

    no killing
    ......................
    goat
    hole
    look before leaping

    knee-jerk bad
    .......................
    dog
    meat
    bridge
    reflection

    greed ? vanity ?

    There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 11:55:20 PM PST

    •  forgot one. (8+ / 0-)

      frog.
      puffing to be bigger.
      splode.

      big frog/little pond
      not that big, really -- mostly hot air.

      (ridicule can be a great weapon. i'm going to learn to master it, somehow. safely.)

      frogs are the canaries-in-the-mines of the planet, btw.

      There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

      by greenbird on Mon Feb 11, 2013 at 11:59:21 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  this one is called "the ox and the frog" (4+ / 0-)

        and the frog doesn't actually burst - that came in later renditions of retelling.

        The Ox and the Frog

        AN OX drinking at a pool trod on a brood of young frogs and crushed one of them to death. The Mother coming up, and missing one of her sons, inquired of his brothers what had become of him. “He is dead, dear Mother; for just now a very huge beast with four great feet came to the pool and crushed him to death with his cloven heel.” The Frog, puffing herself out, inquired, “if the beast was as big as that in size.” “Cease, Mother, to puff yourself out,” said her son, “and do not be angry; for you would, I assure you, sooner burst than successfully imitate

        Translated by George Fyler Townsend. Aesop's Fables (p. 32). Amazon Digital Services, Inc..

        oh, and it REALLY must be late! my post was here all along. oops.  now, off to bed!

        EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

        by edrie on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 01:16:06 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  here ya go! (6+ / 0-)

      from aesopicia...

      THE CROW AND THE WATER JAR

      A thirsty crow noticed a huge jar and saw that at the very bottom there was a little bit of water. For a long time the crow tried to spill the water out so that it would run over the ground and allow her to satisfy her tremendous thirst. After exerting herself for some time in vain, the crow grew frustrated and applied all her cunning with unexpected ingenuity: as she tossed little stones into the jar, the water rose of its own accord until she was able to take a drink.
      This fable shows us that thoughtfulness is superior to brute strength, since this is the way that the crow was able to carry her task to its conclusion.

      your second (from kindle copy):
      The Fox and the Goat

      A FOX one day fell into a deep well and could find no means of escape. A Goat, overcome with thirst, came to the same well, and seeing the Fox, inquired if the water was good. Concealing his sad plight under a merry guise, the Fox indulged in a lavish praise of the water, saying it was excellent beyond measure, and encouraging him to descend. The Goat, mindful only of his thirst, thoughtlessly jumped down, but just as he drank, the Fox informed him of the difficulty they were both in and suggested a scheme for their common escape. “If,” said he, “you will place your forefeet upon the wall and bend your head, I will run up your back and escape, and will help you out afterwards.” The Goat readily assented and the Fox leaped upon his back. Steadying himself with the Goat’s horns, he safely reached the mouth of the well and made off as fast as he could. When the Goat upbraided him for breaking his promise, he turned around and cried out, “You foolish old fellow! If you had as many brains in your head as you have hairs in your beard, you would never have gone down before you had inspected the way up, nor have exposed yourself to dangers from which you had no means of escape.”

      Look before you leap.

      Translated by George Fyler Townsend. Aesop's Fables (p. 21). Amazon Digital Services, Inc..

      and the third you mentioned (also from kindle copy):
      The Dog and the Shadow A DOG, crossing a bridge over a stream with a piece of flesh in his mouth, saw his own shadow in the water and took it for that of another Dog, with a piece of meat double his own in size. He immediately let go of his own, and fiercely attacked the other Dog to get his larger piece from him. He thus lost both: that which he grasped at in the water, because it was a shadow; and his own, because the stream swept it away.

      Translated by George Fyler Townsend. Aesop's Fables (p. 18). Amazon Digital Services, Inc..

      EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

      by edrie on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 01:04:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Do you know if Aesop is the source for the story.. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        edrie

        of the hungry mule who found himself an equal distance between two equal amounts of hay and starved to death because he couldn't decide which one was the best one to eat first. The moral related to something like: if you can't make a decision then you'll perish (or something like that, my memory fades).

        Also a very good book of fables from a modern children's author and illustrator is Arnold Lobel's "Fables" which won the Caldecott Medal in 1983. The stories and morals are very good, maybe a little longer than Aesop's (but still fit on one page) and excellently done illustrations that fit the stories well. A couple of the story titles are "The Crocodile in the Bedroom" (Moral: Without a doubt, there is such a thing as too much order) and "The Pig and the Candy Store" (Moral: A locked door is very likely to discourage temptation)--well you get the idea. I used to have a copy, but my son took it with him when he left the house to live on his own, that's how much he liked the book. My second copy is now with my grandson, so I may have to get another copy again just for me.

        Men must learn now with pity to dispense; For policy sits above conscience. — William Shakespeare, 'Timon of Athens', Act III, Scene II

        by dewtx on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:44:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  rats, lost my post - had the three fables for ya.. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FloridaSNMOM, Portlaw, Aunt Pat

      it's a bit late right now - i'll repost them tomorrow for ya.

      sorry - (@#!&$@ computer!

      EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

      by edrie on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 01:14:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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