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View Diary: The National Debt "Problem" Is a Tragic Myth (22 comments)

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  •  The Democrats don't get a pass either (0+ / 0-)

    But remember, it was the DLC who had a strange hold on the Democratic Party and progressive politics were not emphasized.  Daily Kos was just getting started in 2002.  Had the Democratic Party of today existed in 2002, we wouldn't have had the Iraq War.  In fact, I was a Republican in 2002 and changed my registration to being a Democrat in 2003 because of the GOP and Bush (and of course because my favorite presidents are Harry Truman and John F. Kennedy).

    I watched C-Span videos all the time from 2003-2008 and Democrats in Congress from Charlie Rangel, Tim Ryan, Kendrick Meek and Debbie Wasserman-Shultz were talking about the debt problems almost non-stop.

    The Democrats were mainly responsible for the 2002 Iraq War Resolution, which allowed President Bush to potentially wage war as a last result.  A lot of people in the liberal and progressive community (I'm a progressive myself from Berkeley) interpreted this as code for war, not for diplomacy.  In retrospect, I agree although in real actuality, the Iraq War Resolution was a vote for diplomacy, then war as a last resort.

    That being said, Congress has a responsibility to do the checks and balances and it blew this big time during the Bush years although starting in 2007, things started to ease down and more accountability was given.  It was a bit too late though as the Iraq War had already been underway for years and it was difficult to manage.  

    Even though the Democrats in Congress were voting to extend the funding in the Iraq War, the thing is, they were the ones who were also calling for hearings and transparency on the Iraq War handling and purpose.  The GOP barely did any of this or really none of it at all.  They wait until the last minute to do pretty much anything, as if someone piles on debt and then waits until it hits $1,000 or more before finally doing something about it.

    So we could talk about how Democrats were back years ago but the point is, we have to focus particularly on 2014 because the GOP right now is getting hits pretty much every single day and they don't stop coming.  If there's any better time to be a progressive than now, it really doesn't exist.  The Democratic Party has a great opportunity to increase its base unlike anything that excited since the early 1960's.  Now of course the Democratic Party is more tolerant of minorities whereas in the 1950's, not as much.

    And right now, I want as many of the House Republicans defeated for re-election as humanly possible, whatever it takes, I'm there to assist.  I don't care how deep red, lean conservative or moderate the districts are.  Objective is Project Annihilation and we need to get them out of there, ASAP.

    •  OK (0+ / 0-)

      But I come from a slightly different place.

      1.  I am not a Progressive, because I don't understand the parameters of that designation. They seem to be made up as they go along. Plus, as your comment demonstrates, partisan politics seems a greater priority than moving the ball.

      2. I don't believe in win at any cost in politics, because I don't think it's possible in this form of government, and I have no particular desire to change that. I am particularly leery of proposed 'solutions' that don't acknowledge that 'solutions' is a short word for 'another set of problems'.

      3. Consequently, I don't believe any side is blameless. For example, what is the philosophical difference between the Jews claiming they are Gods chosen people, and Progressives claiming they would save the world if only unfettered by other points of view? Both are possible, I suppose, and thousands of years of human nature could be wrong, but I doubt it.

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