Skip to main content

View Diary: A Staff Member Can Solicit A Guest For Sex If They Want To. (154 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I would also venture a guess that... (53+ / 0-)

    the separation of individuals through social networks play a part in all of this.

    Like drivers scream and yell at other motorists in ways they would never do in a physical line at say a resteraunt because of the physical barriers, so does our computers and phones isolate us from real interaction between people.  I believe this hardens people to think of others in the abstract, the poor, the lazy, the minorities, etc...

    I believe that the more we think of people as abstract groups, the easier it is to classify them and blame all others for the stereotypical behavior of the assigned group.  With radio and TV personalities ready and willing to assign blame to these groups, the prejudices and biases manifest themselves into actual hatred when exposed to them especially when one has some sort of authority over them.

    I have seen time after time people spewing hatred towards specific groups and then making exceptions for themselves or those close to them when their own hypocracy is revealed.  My biological brother (whom I have met only twice) is quick to quote Rush about the freeloaders on medicaid and yet wants to make sure our mother gets hers and is taken care of in the best way possible.  We have to find ways to make it all personal and make sure that we remove the barriers that shield them from making the personal connections.

    "Perhaps the sentiments contained in the following pages, are not YET sufficiently fashionable to procure them general favour..."

    by Buckeye Nut Schell on Sun Feb 24, 2013 at 07:22:06 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  I would say just the opposite (8+ / 0-)

      Online social media has created links between people who were previously unlikely to feel any connection. How much more difficult is it to advocate war against China if you have an online friend living in Beijing?

      No doubt the anonymity and compartmentalization of online interactions encourage people to act and speak with less empathy and compassion than face-to-face contact and prompts bigotry in online interactions, as evidenced by mountains of research, but I'm not aware of any evidence that there is some crossover effect that results in greater overall cruelty in day-to-day in-person interactions. Surely it's difficult to think back to the 60's and 70's as a time when Americans had greater compassion and less hatred for minorities and the underprivileged. While we should not airbrush the present, there is no sense in romanticizing an American heritage packed with an unsavory legacy of racism, sexism, misogyny, homophobia, xenophobia, antisemitism, anti-Catholicism and other forms of bigotry that have, if anything, steadily declined since the close of the 19th century. Acknowledging this dark legacy is a prudent and necessary measure to addressing the cloud of hate and selfishness that continues to cast its shadow across America today.

      •  We can both be right here... (5+ / 0-)

        I agree that the social construct of the pre-computer social network era was not necessarily less hate filled but a big reason for that was also compartmentization.  I grew up in an all white town where there was absolutely zero racial diversity.  I grew up with pollack jokes and N1gg@r jokes and I was so isolated that I didn't believe them to be serious.  It wasn't until I branched out and made friends that I found out racism was real.

        Segregation was a huge promoter of racism and hate.  It seems that as we have begun to tear down those walls, we have also started building new, virtual walls to replace them.  Us and them is as pervasive on-line as racism was during the height of the segregated south.  The only difference is there are more classifications now and we are often just as guilty as they are.

        Loook at the comment sections of political threads on Yahoo or CNN.  Tell me these people would be as courageous to be as hateful if they actually had to face another human being when doing so.  I also have seen the biggest, loud mouth racists STFU when they were in front of a real life black person.  

        People on-line tend to self segregate.  People do not tend to form an on-line relationship with anyone they differ too much from so your example of communicating with someone from China only works if the person is open minded enough to try it.

        "Perhaps the sentiments contained in the following pages, are not YET sufficiently fashionable to procure them general favour..."

        by Buckeye Nut Schell on Mon Feb 25, 2013 at 09:23:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Using comment threads on Yahoo (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jpmassar

          and other news sites is hardly representative of what people think and do. The number of trolls there is incredible. They're purposely trying to get a rise out of folks by saying outrageous things.

          People on-line tend to self segregate.  People do not tend to form an on-line relationship with anyone they differ too much from so your example of communicating with someone from China only works if the person is open minded enough to try it.
          I still don't see how this is significantly different from life before social networks. I have plenty of friends on social networks who are rather different than me and with whom I have various conversations about politics.
          •  Not to mention one person can actually be (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            jpmassar

            a thousand trolls as the hardest part would be setting up a thousand email accounts.  Even then, everything but the CAPTCHA could be automated so at say, 100 email accounts created per day (that includes the time necessary to find and switch proxies or even create his/her own botnet) the troll could have a thousand in about a year.

            You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

            by Throw The Bums Out on Mon Feb 25, 2013 at 11:04:27 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  They have programs that do a lot of it (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              jpmassar

              And there are a lot of troll. More than that, part of the problem is that the reasonable comments get lost in the noise. One troll can cause people to flip out and start being assholes back thus derailing the whole comment section. They more people involved and the less connection between them the more likely that is to happen. If I'm talking about something with my friends and their circle of friends it's more likely to remain civil, even if we have wildly different opinions. The Yahoo example actually shows how social networks are preferable to just comments on articles.

      •  I'd argue that it's a blend. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        plooto, jpmassar

        People who only want to deal with people like them find it increasingly possible to find news and social media targeted to just them.

        People who don't mind having or actively want to have contact with all sorts of different people have most of the world at their fingertips.

        So the local homophobes can have their Facebook newsfeeds with every single ally driven off because how-could-you-post-that I-don't-want-to-see-that, and I can have the GLBT crew from college on mine and late night conversations here and even though we live in the same community we live in completely different worlds.

        They can live in a world where they never have to ponder what being certain ways would really be like and I can live in a world where a rather closeted trans friend too far away to hug who was all 'don't worry if you mess up on pronouns' when zie (gender intentionally obfuscated) came out just had zir first wrong-pronouns-really-hurt experience recently and could actually tell those of us too far away for hugs that this had happened. (And make me worry and wish for hugs-over-IP technology again, but zie has access to a wide-flung support network and that's what really matters.)

        Or they live can in a world where the food bank and the 'if you need immediate shelter call' number on the door are the closest they ever get to dealing with homeless people and I can live in a world where I can read things like this and exist in a world where anyone could be homeless and just using a library computer for an hour now and then.

        If you have a closed mind it becomes an echo chamber, if you have an open mind it becomes a wide open universe with wonderful people in it.

        Prayers and best wishes to those in Japan.

        by Cassandra Waites on Mon Feb 25, 2013 at 09:34:04 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Good Comment! (4+ / 0-)

      Thanks Buckeye! Your comment is very enlightening and made me take a step back and check my own prejudices against groups. I think it's important for progressives to do the same. Calling someone you think is stupid a tea party member or a rush-bot or a Republican is just as bad as attacking someone because they are "poor and lazy" or a "welfare queen." It is generalizing a whole person's being into one word and that just isn't practical. Thanks again.

      "This site's unofficial motto used to be "more and better Democrats", but we've gradually evolved it to "better Democrats".- Kos,11/29/2011.

      by progressivevoice on Mon Feb 25, 2013 at 08:42:18 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  The problem with that guess is that (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jpmassar, KenBee

      your example of road rage predates social networks, as do every example of egregious violence and injustice we see in this country.

      I have seen time after time people spewing hatred towards specific groups and then making exceptions for themselves or those close to them when their own hypocracy is revealed.  My biological brother (whom I have met only twice) is quick to quote Rush about the freeloaders on medicaid and yet wants to make sure our mother gets hers and is taken care of in the best way possible.  We have to find ways to make it all personal and make sure that we remove the barriers that shield them from making the personal connections.
      I'm not sure why you'd think that hypocrisy is anything new under the sun. And Rush is the perfect example of that. Social networks are what is destroying Rush, not what causes folks like him to get famous.

      I think this is just another example of blaming ongoing social ills on whatever the most recent technology is. Like those damn long haired hippies and TV destroying the world.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site