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View Diary: The Illinois Department of Public Health vs. Illinois Raw Milk Farmers (267 comments)

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  •  Your (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    johnnymonicker

    pasteurized milk is about 12% pus from the mastitis-infected udders of captive RBGH-injected cows who spend most of their days standing in their own shit. One sick customer of a small raw milk dairy can doom the operation, and yet the pasteurized milk industry, which is responsible for horrifying conditions, overuse of antibiotics, and air pollution that sickens children in California's Central Valley goes merrily along whenever there is an outbreak of e-coli because they know Americans are addicted to milk. The industry's dairies are inspected yet this doesn't stop outbreaks of sickness.

    •  Not necessarily (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FG

      Actually, the milk I buy is from my neighbor, and my customers, and farmers that I work with, and is bottled in nice glass bottles down in Aurora, IL where it is low-heat pasturized. I get a product that I know is safe, I buy from local farmers and a local dairy processor, and we're all happy.

      I grew up on raw milk, on my parents' dairy farm. There is no way I would buy raw milk, now, however. Certainly not milk from someone who is against getting a Grade A milk license. That's insane. No inspection records? No standards? No regulation? Just a 'trust me, I'm a farmer?' Fuck that.

      •  Unless I'm mistaken . . . (0+ / 0-)

        The Grade-A Dairy license would require the farmers to own pasteurization equipment . . . which defeats the purpose of selling raw milk.

        But I'll need to confirm that.

        From what I understand, this equipment could cost each farmer up to $25,000. That would put all but my Aunt and Uncle's farm out of business, and the only reason they would survive that regulation is because they're tenant farmers and their landlord already owns the equipment. He just doesn't use it.

        •  Hmm (0+ / 0-)

          I don't know about own. My parents' Illinois dairy is a Grade-A operation, no pasteurization equipment on site. In my experience Grade certification is about inspections and standards.

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