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View Diary: Off Grid: Utilities? We don't need no stinkin' utilities. (59 comments)

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  •  LEDS are very efficient (0+ / 0-)

    you get about 70-80% efficient, you can in a demo touch a 60 watt LED bulb with your fingers. a CFL gets real warm and an Incadescent or halogen will give you burns.

    Halogen is much better then conventional CFL but it's still
    a power hog.

    •  thanks, but the newer ones (0+ / 0-)

      are now safe? That's more what I was worried about.

      I have a vague recollection of someone buying one of those torchere lamps when halogens were new, and the damn thing caught fire.

      Is light quality about the same with LED or halogen? I avoid the CFLs because fluorescents flicker, and it drives my eyes crazy. Terrible in places like grocery stores.

      Life is extremely cheap to the right-wing until a decision about it is either in the hands of a pregnant women or a Democratic president. -- Lia Matera

      by Mnemosyne on Mon Mar 11, 2013 at 11:24:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  LEDs are safe, have little flicker, and good color (0+ / 0-)

        Yea, the latest round of LEDs is quite safe, I haven't heard anything about risk of fire or anything. They don't get hot like halogen, but there's always a risk with household electricity of a short in a wire (but that's the lamp, not the bulb, at fault)

        There's no flickering with most LEDs, at least not at a frequency that is visible to a human eye. In some cases, they are dimmed using short pulses of power, called PWM, but the pulses should be way too fast for anything but a machine to ever detect.

        The color generated by LEDs isn't perfect, but it's not bad either. An incandescent bulb produces a Color Rendering Index (CRI) of 1.0 by definition, LEDs are generally in the 0.80 or 0.90 range. So it looks pretty close, but I wouldn't want to be trying to match closely tinted socks together under nothing but LED light.

        •  thanks, but my question (0+ / 0-)

          was, are halogens safe to use?

          Life is extremely cheap to the right-wing until a decision about it is either in the hands of a pregnant women or a Democratic president. -- Lia Matera

          by Mnemosyne on Mon Mar 11, 2013 at 02:30:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Are Halogens safe to use? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Mnemosyne

            yeah.

            I'd use them on a UL Listed lamped and make sure they are UL listed.

            Now they are hot, so you need to make sure they are away from flammable materials.  

            http://www.cpsc.gov/...

            Halogen torchiere floor lamps are free-standing lamps with a shallow bowl-shaped light fixture mounted on top of a 6-foot pole and illuminated by a tubular halogen bulb. These lamps first became available in the United States in 1983 and sales have grown significantly in the 1990s. The tubular halogen bulbs operate at temperatures much hotter than regular bulbs, and can pose a fire risk if curtains, clothing, or other flammable materials contact the bulb.

            A revised Underwriters Laboratories (UL) standard for halogen torchiere floor lamps manufactured after February 5, 1997, offers an improved level of safety. Most halogen torchiere floor lamps meeting the revised UL standard already are equipped with a glass or wire guard over the glass bulb shield to help prevent flammable materials from touching the bulb.

            so i would say a post 1997 fixture is probably safe enough for home use.  I wouldn't put them anywhere little kids are around or rambunctious cats.

            The issue was very cheap chinese lamps from the early 90's would provide ignition sources.  New ones have wire guards

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