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View Diary: How much is a hijacked LinkedIn account worth? You'll be amazed. (23 comments)

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  •  Level of employment always seems important. (6+ / 0-)

    Every time my company terminates a "regular" employee, we just find out because they're no longer there, or they call and cry. Execs with the same terms of employment (not talking about those with contracts or special terms) get terminated with litigation and benefits that were absent at the time of their at-will hiring.

    The diary is about LinkedIn but its also about the perils of treating an exec's name as a proxy for her office or for the brand itself.

    What bothers me is the idea, universally followed apparently, that an exec's work adheres to him or her, while the work of others belongs to the company.

    Severance package, or bribe, to the already highly-paid; separation on a minute's notice for the other 90 percent.

    Nevertheless, it's also true that you should never think you can port credentials, so don't get your creds overly associated with an employer. Is that right?

    “liberals are the people who think that cruelty is the worst thing that we do” --Richard Rorty Also, I moved from NYC, so my username is inaccurate.

    by jeff in nyc on Fri Mar 15, 2013 at 07:34:17 PM PDT

    •  In my experience you only receive severance (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Avila, jeff in nyc

      under two circumstances, if it is written company policy or you negotiate it when you are hired. Occasionally if the company has a big RIF, or is acquired and lots of people lose their jobs, the company might have a special severance plan.
      Executives have severance plans because they are negotiated as part of their employment agreements when they are hired or promoted, a point where they have leverage. Plus companies like have pre-negotiated severance so that executives can be terminated "at will" and there is no litigation, which could be embarrassing to the company.
       

      "let's talk about that"

      by VClib on Fri Mar 15, 2013 at 10:03:05 PM PDT

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      •  For whatever reason, I am apparently doomed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Avila

        To experience first hand what experts will say does not happen. I'm going to calmly state that I am utterly certain that at-will execs arbitrate and get large payouts.

        “liberals are the people who think that cruelty is the worst thing that we do” --Richard Rorty Also, I moved from NYC, so my username is inaccurate.

        by jeff in nyc on Fri Mar 15, 2013 at 10:16:25 PM PDT

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        •  I have seen lots of senior executive employment (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Avila, jeff in nyc, Adam B

          agreements. All of them have severance clauses that outline the payouts, which can be very significant. This is particularly true at the CEO level where you are recruiting someone who is in a high paying position and is leaving unvested options or restricted stock to take the new job. There are always details that come up when the executive is terminated, but those are for small amounts. These employment agreements are negotiated with experienced counsel advising both sides when they are initially drafted. The whole idea is to avoid litigation or arbitration when the executive is terminated. Within my universe I haven't seen any go to arbitration. For public companies these agreements are disclosed when signed and the payouts are also disclosed in the proxy statements when the executive is terminated, so there is actually a lot of transparency.

          "let's talk about that"

          by VClib on Fri Mar 15, 2013 at 10:28:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I was talking about cases of at will and no prior (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Avila, VClib

            Agreement, though.

            “liberals are the people who think that cruelty is the worst thing that we do” --Richard Rorty Also, I moved from NYC, so my username is inaccurate.

            by jeff in nyc on Fri Mar 15, 2013 at 11:06:25 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Jeff, that's rare these days (0+ / 0-)

              For senior executives the details of their compensation, including severance details, are all public so it's very apparent when there is not a written document that is filed with the SEC. With the significantly more detailed reporting requirements and transparency nearly all senior executives have a written agreement.

              "let's talk about that"

              by VClib on Sat Mar 16, 2013 at 06:41:33 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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