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View Diary: On the Political Theory of "Coming Out": The Personal IS Political Edition (8 comments)

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  •  Yes, coming out works. So what? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AaronInSanDiego, Ian S

    EVERYBODY has been opportunistic on this. It's just that the people we like come to these conclusions a smidge sooner than the people we don't like. It's unfortunate that Dick Cheney was at this point well before most other politicians.

    Also, think back to 2004, if you can. The Republicans' GAY people (Ken Mehlman) were pushing all the initiatives to amend state constitutions. Do you expect me to forget that for Rob Portman?

    Yes, you're right, and yes, we do, but no Republican gets a free pass on this in my book.

    -7.75, -8.10; . . . Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall (h/t cooper888)

    by Dave in Northridge on Sat Mar 16, 2013 at 06:49:25 PM PDT

    •  It amounts to this: (0+ / 0-)

      Should I hold the 32 Democratic Senators and 118 Democratic Congressmen to their DOMA--AYE votes, too?

      Because, if not, it stinks of hypocrisy.

      •  WHEN were they cast? (0+ / 0-)

        How much time has passed between then and now? It's over a decade, isn't it? When did Portman cast his last anti-LGBT vote? More recently, no?

        -7.75, -8.10; . . . Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall (h/t cooper888)

        by Dave in Northridge on Sat Mar 16, 2013 at 07:17:03 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  So your answer is "Yes", we give them a pass? (0+ / 0-)

          In any event, Portman was in the Bush administration from 2005-2007, and didn't become a Senator until 2011, so the DOMA vote was one of his last anti-LGBT votes.  He voted against LGBT adoption in DC in 1999, three years later, but so did more than 20 Democratic members.

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