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View Diary: Moondai Furbutts (202 comments)

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  •  It's called "stinging" for a reason. (0+ / 0-)

    But the herbal capsules have no sting in them. The stinging hairs are evidently removed in processing before the leaves are encapsulated.

    From Wikipedia:

    The plant has many hollow stinging hairs called trichomes on its leaves and stems, which act like hypodermic needles, injecting histamine and other chemicals that produce a stinging sensation when contacted by humans and other animals.[1] The plant has a long history of use as a medicine and as a food source.

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    For the first time in human history, we possess both the means for destroying all life on Earth or realizing a paradise on the planet--Michio Kaku.

    by psyched on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 12:31:33 PM PDT

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    •  I know... BUT... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FarWestGirl

      ... if a person is allergic to the whole plant (including the pollen), it can't be used by allergic people as a medicine or as a food source.

      e.g., I'm allergic to sage, both as a pollen and as a spice in food; it's a guaranteed three-day migraine, as is MSG.  I made the mistake of adding the spice to food and suffered badly those three days, and that's after I received a battery of tests and knew sage pollen was an allergen for me.  Jeez, talk about a stupid move on my part not to connect sage as a spice with pollen from sage plants that could both trigger an allergy attack.

      Tests said I was allergic to tomato flower pollen.  I used to use ketchup on practically everything for nearly every meal, so I was pretty well addicted to it; the only time I couldn't eat ketchup was when I was pregnant because then I got heartburn (only time I've ever had heartburn, in fact).  Unbeknownst to me at that point was that an addiction is a reverse allergy.  Feed the addiction and things are okay.  Take it away and one goes through withdrawal.  That's what I had to do with ketchup.  Once I went through the withdrawal, the horrendous migraine, I was okay.  Once withdrawal was over with, I can't stand the smell of ketchup or tomato sauce.

      What I didn't know when I was younger is that foods to which I'm allergic are the triggers for most all of the migraines I've had.  I stick to a disgustingly boring diet of bland foods now, and voila!  No migraines!

      I have pages of pollen allergies.  All the conifer trees, most of the deciduous trees (only exception seems to be oak; been tested twice, no reaction), the standard ragweed, goldenrod, virtually all grain pollens.  The damned list just goes on and on.  When people in the neighborhood burn wood in fireplaces in winter I get a sneezing fit from pine smoke.

      It's not just one portion of a plant one is sensitized to, but the whole thing.  Think in terms of peanuts.  There was a young college-age man who died just three or four days ago because he was severely allergic to peanuts, ate half of one cookie w/ peanut oil in it, and he died.

      There are just some things some people just can't have because of allergies.

      People without allergies are lucky since they can eat just about anything without any ill effects.

      I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

      by NonnyO on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 02:00:06 PM PDT

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      •  I am sorry you have these problems. (0+ / 0-)

        They must be very difficult to deal with.

        My comment above was not meant to downplay your experiences, but was for the benefit of anyone who might read it who could have a choice between drug and natural herbal solutions. All drugs have side effects which may not be instantly observable. The same could be true of natural choices, but at least with an herb that has been used for centuries we have some favorable background to consider, while new drugs have very little history to go by. Plus the historical users of herbs didn't have the sociopathic wealth-generating incentive that Big Pharma has.
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        For the first time in human history, we possess both the means for destroying all life on Earth or realizing a paradise on the planet--Michio Kaku.

        by psyched on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 06:15:08 PM PDT

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        •  Thank you... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          psyched

          I cope, have been doing so for many decades, so I'm used to it.  My family is full of allergic people, not necessarily the same allergies - except most of us can't deal with chemical scents, so there's that in common.  My mother had emphysema and asthma and my father died of an unrelated, rare, always-fatal lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis nineteen years before Mom died.  Between their deaths, chemical perfume scents came into being, the bane of my existence (and other family members).  Scented products while shopping could set off a coughing episode for my mother in the store so bad I thought she was going to die on the spot.  There's an element of genetics to allergies which is why I'm very aware of them.  Both my parents had different allergies, and it turns out both my brother and I have them, and so do some of his kids.

          I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

          by NonnyO on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 11:00:23 PM PDT

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