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View Diary: Climate change, a bit of reality (7 comments)

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  •  Here is the oildrum article link: (5+ / 0-)

    http://www.theoildrum.com/...

    Thank you for the post ... as evidenced by the Bangalore/India case, the thorny relationship between energy demand, standard of living and environmental impacts is an exceedingly tough nut, especially when alternative stationary and transportation power generation technologies remain nascent, more expensive and with limited national and international financing systems in place. See, e.g., http://www.forbes.com/...

    •  India (and China) (5+ / 0-)

      will implement "renewables" wherever they can, and wherever it makes economic sense.  It's the "makes economic sense" that's the real bottleneck for financing . . . that and the intermittency problem (batteries are beyond question still way too expensive).

      You can sub wind and solar into an already functioning system (as they are doing in Germany), since the necessary backup capacity (and at least some of the distribution infrastructure) is already there.  That's not the case in India . . . when the sun goes down or the wind stops blowing there is no "surplus" capacity to fall back on, and very little of the infrastructure required to move power around to load share even exists.  That in turn makes the capital cost of a functioning renewable system dramatically higher than it is where backup and distribution infrastructure already exist, and it is of course going to be hard to find financing for a project unlikely to ever recover its costs.

      Financing for a nuclear option (instead of coal) is essentially blocked by India's not being a signatory to the nonproliferation treaty.

      Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

      by Deward Hastings on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 01:56:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  But renewables make economic sense in (1+ / 0-)
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        JeffW
        India (and China) will implement "renewables" wherever they can, and wherever it makes economic sense.  It's the "makes economic sense" that's the real bottleneck for financing . . . that and the intermittency problem (batteries are beyond question still way too expensive).  
        India more than almost any other place.  Unsubsidised solar has reached grid parity in India, which means that solar power costs the same as grid power.  http://thinkprogress.org/...

        Grid power in India is notoriously unreliable; IOW, it's seriously intermittent also, at least as much as renewables if not more so.  And anyone who can afford it supplements grid power with a gasoline or diesel generator, which is a lot more expensive than solar.  All this points to a likely "explosion" of solar power systems with battery backup to supplement the Indian grid.  If the grid locally is "on", the solar panels feed power back to the grid, augmenting it's supply and making it more reliable.  If the grid locally is "off", the solar panels and batteries supply their owner's need.  As oil prices rise, grid + solar + batteries will be increasingly cheaper than grid + generator + fuel.  

        Renewable energy brings national global security.     

        by Calamity Jean on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 11:39:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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