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View Diary: BREAKING: Steubenville's Jane Doe Receives Death Threats (220 comments)

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  •  Those particular voices... (8+ / 0-)

    seem to be teenagers. They're filled with hyperbole, Internet exaggeration, complete incomprehension of the consequences of words, blindness of the feelings of others, and an overwhelming sense of self. The one who says "God will get her" is not threatening but is showing a socialized response. He's saying, "Vengeance is mine sayeth the Lord" -- i.e. people should pray for her to stop drinking, because the divine judgment would be more severe than any of you. That marks his as the most mature of the lot. The rest seem to be oblivious children, regardless of age.

    What is it that adolescents specialize in? In my experience, they see their subjective state as extending out beyond the horizon. I doubt any of these are business people. They need therapy and counseling, they need to understand empathy.

    Everyone is innocent of some crime.

    by The Geogre on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 05:24:00 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  lacking context which face to face encounters (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lujane, The Geogre, SchuyH

      give us, it is difficult to say, except to note if it is kids, kids frequently reflect what they are taught at home and also, there are a lot of people out there with extreme opinions who are not kids and teens.

      Most of the extreme remarks I have seen have been on major media sites where the content is more "adult" than where I would expect to see a bunch of kids posting  

      •  They are also influenced by peers. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SchuyH
      •  To be clear, I wasn't excusing anyone (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SchuyH

        I was just pointing out that the text showed, in glowing red letters, "Me feel bad! Me want you die!"  

        I have seen grown ups who never pass that adolescent phase. The "bro" culture revels in it. The tan & bleach group of Caucasian twenties, too, celebrate it, but the rest are either in "business" or the GOP.

        It's an egoism that comes from immaturity or an egotism that comes drenched in fear. Either way, the persons saying these things (esp. the young woman who was also among the voices before the trial cursing the victim) don't seem to be psychologically well.

        Everyone is innocent of some crime.

        by The Geogre on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 01:40:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  As if teenagers are incapable of killing. Will (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LSophia, Dogs are fuzzy, Dhavo, SchuyH

      you still feel the same way when those same teenagers suddenly take an interest in competitive shooting or skeet shooting after not being interested at all or would it take a drive-by or three?

      You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

      by Throw The Bums Out on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 06:19:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  As if? What? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SchuyH

        I have no sympathy for the teenagers, except that I note that they are dysfunctional. Of course they can be dangerous. In fact, they are damaging already, but trying to aim for these desperadoes feels somehow wrong if they are un-integrated egos and children trying to use the most painful words they can find and having no living meaning of any of them.

        I didn't like teenagers when I was one, and I don't like them any more now. I don't like local chat rooms, either. Peeking in on a combination of the two seems guaranteed to generate horror. How you can see my comments as letting them off the hook, just because I put us on the hook too, is beyond me.

        Everyone is innocent of some crime.

        by The Geogre on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 02:07:15 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Social media peer groups (8+ / 0-)

      Looks to be a real downside of our new hi-tech world.  Sad to see kids using this tool to isolate themselves from their parents and become immersed in a vast anonymous, dysfunctional peer group.

      Kids at this age are so vulnerable to peer pressure.  What a challenge for today's parents who have to try to isolate them from such a bad influence.  

      It is an old strategy of tyrants to delude their victims into fighting their battles for them. FDR

      by Betty Pinson on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 08:48:13 AM PDT

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      •  A cyber Lord of the Flies (10+ / 0-)

        With no adult supervision

        The road to excess leads to the palace of Wisdom, I must not have excessed enough

        by JenS on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 10:01:00 AM PDT

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        •  Exactly (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          irishwitch, JenS, Cassandra Waites, SchuyH

          Thanks for putting it so succinctly.  I can't put all the blame on the parents, its so difficult to completely disconnect kids from social media.  What a nightmare.  I had a hard enough time monitoring my kids computer use at that age using desktop computers.  It would be a full time job keeping up with their passwords, etc.

          It is an old strategy of tyrants to delude their victims into fighting their battles for them. FDR

          by Betty Pinson on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 11:49:21 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ha! I can't even remember all of MY passwords (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SchuyH

            let alone my kids'.  I just insist on having a bad router that doesn't reach in the kids' rooms so internet surfing happens at the dining table.  Just like before ubiquitous cell phones, the only phone was in the kitchen/dining room. If you didn't want to use language we could all hear you couldn't use the phone. And their earliest cell phones were in high school and could only call, not text or surf.
            But that was 8 years or so ago. It's lots harder now to control social media access as they have made it so easy to be connected.

            The road to excess leads to the palace of Wisdom, I must not have excessed enough

            by JenS on Mon Mar 18, 2013 at 03:57:15 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  We told our children (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        irishwitch, SchuyH

        that as long as they maintained our trust we would respect their electronic privacy.  If they break our trust then we would monitor all electronic communication with nanny software.  

    •  They need to understand shame (7+ / 0-)

      and understand that their actions have permanent consequences.  Just taking away that little brat's social media?  Big deal.

      Since the only thing they apparently care about is their standing with their peers and friends, that should be where the focus is.

      How about having to stand in front of the whole school assembly, holding a sign that says, "I am a harassing bully?"  Or wear a great big "B" letter for a semester?

      Plus, immediately getting kicked out of all honor societies, teams, cheerleading, any kind of extra-curricular activities - and make restitution.  Volunteer work, as well, for all time not actually spent in class or doing homework.  Preferably, boring, dirty, and time-consuming.

      And NO access to social media or the Internet.

      Yes, teens do stupid stuff, but it's the job of parents and other adults to show them why it's not okay.

    •  Thanks for the perspective. (9+ / 0-)

      When it comes to things like bullying and rape among minors, I always see the pitchforks rising up.  What is needed here is good, quality sex ed, the kind that even the most progressive schools don't have.

      We need to explain consent, not just between adults and children (to avoid pedophiles) but between peers, to avoid rape.

      The message right now is "don't do it."  But it's lost on the boys who don't care because there is no consequence to them.  They can't get pregnant and there's very little risk of disease.  

      They need to understand that once a person is impaired, they are in the rape zone.  Period.  That impairment can be age, sobriety or mental capacity.  

      If you are not man enough to ask permission and be granted permission before you act, you are not man enough.  We need to stop equating machismo with sheer brute force alone.  That really diminishes the vast majority of men who play by the rules of civility and propriety.

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