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View Diary: The U.S. government? Catholic bishops want to shut that whole thing down (110 comments)

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  •  Anti-Semitism is pretty ingrained down here. (3+ / 0-)
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    Blue Bell Bookworm, corvo, DvCM

    And I don't use "gyp" for precisely that reason--or "maroon" for that matter.

    I just wanted him to THINK before he said that sort of thing again.

    The last time we mixed religion and politics people got burned at the stake.

    by irishwitch on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 05:11:57 PM PDT

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    •  Some folks are more sensitive to language (2+ / 0-)
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      phonegery, irishwitch

      than others.  I try, but I don't claim perfection myself.

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Tue Mar 19, 2013 at 06:58:00 PM PDT

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    •  These words are offensive?! (2+ / 0-)
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      maf1029, Bonnie B

       Please educate me on their origins.  I hate being ignorant.  'Maroon' is a color to me, and I've never known it to be used any other way.  I can now guess how 'gyp' was originally used, but it never occurred to me to wonder where it came from.
      Thanks.

      Too soon old, too late smart.....

      by DvCM on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 06:15:30 AM PDT

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      •  The Langugae Cops™... (2+ / 0-)
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        DvCM, Bonnie B

        ....OMG, Heaven for-FEND, and Holy {loud car horn}balls!!! -- I used the word 'cop', and that's DEEPLY OFFENSIVE too! 'Cop' is derived from the Dutch word 'kafen' (to steal) about 400 years ago (around the time of 'maroon'), so 'cops' are actually thieves, and that's offensive!
        Anyway --
        I'm assuming we all know about Romani→Egypt→to 'gyp'.
        Maroon, however -- now that's some obscure folderol to get all het up about.
        When not capitalized, maroon can refer to the color or to someone who has been marooned.  
        The verb maroon  to strand someone where rescue is not quickly forthcoming) most likely stems from the Meso-American Spanish cimarrón or French maron (one R), both meaning feral or wild.
        But, when capitalized as a proper noun, 'Maroon' refers to a 17th century escaped slave from Guyana or the West Indies.
        I suppose if one needs to be offended by something, one is free to grasp at a 400 year old straw.
        If it were me personally, I'd go for something even more obscure and anachronistic, such as referring to children as tykes (which beats maroon by 300 years), so that I could really go over the top to the best of my ability. ☺

        "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction." - Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), Pensées, #894

        by maf1029 on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 11:56:57 AM PDT

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        •  Well, gee~ (1+ / 0-)
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          maf1029

          I think I'd be proud to be called a descendant of escaped slaves of the 17th century, but I suppose that 'Maroon' now means 'wild, unruly, savage', etc.  It's probably a serious dis...somewhere.  I had forgotten the desert island stranding thing.
          As for 'gyp', I have no clue about any Romani-->Egypt correlation, but will look it up.
          I grew up in an early Dutch settlement in the Hudson River Valley, so 'kafen'-->cop is an old joke.
          I am really respectful and avoid using any pejorative I'm aware of, but there is a regional and cultural minefield out there.  I once stung someone to the quick by using what I thought was a perfectly innocuous phrase, unaware that it had  evolved from an ethnic slur.  Boy, was my face red...
          Thank you for taking the time to enlighten me.

          Too soon old, too late smart.....

          by DvCM on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 04:37:11 PM PDT

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          •  "Gypsy".... not just a musical anymore (1+ / 0-)
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            DvCM

            Short version: the Romani people migrated westward across Europe from India beginning about 1500 years ago. The legend (probably untrue) was that the Romani would tell the locals that they were from Egypt (Egyptians) and were eventually called Gypsies as a diminutive. And the xenophobic fear of being robbed by Gypsies {sic} lead to the coining of to gyp (meaning to steal, swindle, or rob) as a verb.  
            To be honest, I can kind of/sort of see how 'maroon' might possibly be perhaps more than a tish un-nice if it's capitalized and used in the context of escaped slaves from Guyana circa 1600. I'm sure there's a connection between Maroon and the  antebellum caste of racial qualifications ending in -aroon from the Deep South.
            But this whole "I'm offended by every third word that comes out of your mouth because 300 years ago...." crap has just got to stop, no matter how much fun it would be to respond with "The" to someone suffering from Iamoffendeditis™, which cheapens actual offense for the rest of us, might I add. :-)

            "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction." - Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), Pensées, #894

            by maf1029 on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 07:57:09 PM PDT

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            •  Taking umbrage seems to be rather fun (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              maf1029

              and a useful tool to promote a personal agenda for some folks.  On the other hand, there are many words and phrases that can be innocuous in one setting, but disparaging in another; however, the intention of a speaker is usually clear in the context of a conversation.  
              I understand your exasperation with the frequency of people taking exception to out-of-date usages, but the real problem
              is that too often one person's hostility is projected onto a non-hostile person, creating unnecessary, useless conflict.    
              To over-react with anger to a neutral usage of a word or phrase that is loaded in another context is counter-productive and a waste of energy.  "Are you aware that what you just said means ...(fill in the blank)... to ...(fill in the blank)...?", is a common way to handle this.
              High Dudgeon is appropriate only when severe insult is deliberately given, in the context of a hostile exchange.  The assumption that something offensive to you, when neutrally- and/or well-intentionally given, must be hostile, is ridiculous.    

              Too soon old, too late smart.....

              by DvCM on Thu Mar 21, 2013 at 05:27:18 AM PDT

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              •  Yes, yes, yes (1+ / 0-)
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                DvCM
                To over-react with anger to a neutral usage of a word or phrase that is loaded in another context is counter-productive and a waste of energy.
                Perfectly stated.
                But unfortunately, some words or phrases are loaded like a diaper with that other context. Anyone else remember the tar baby bruhaha from 2006?
                I would say that's one to be avoided.
                But generally, the Faux Dudgeon crowd doesn't give a tinker's damn about context. Saying "The storm crippled communications" is the same as pointing to someone in a wheelchair and shrieking, "Cripple! Cripple!"
                And don't get me started about the perfectly good verb to retard!
                 

                "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction." - Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), Pensées, #894

                by maf1029 on Thu Mar 21, 2013 at 10:28:47 AM PDT

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