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View Diary: It's Time for This Crap to Stop (103 comments)

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  •  Why Did the Server Turn the Money Into the Police? (6+ / 0-)

    I mean, I guess that is "doing the right thing," but after the customer insisted that the woman keep it, why turn it in? She's a mother of 5 kids and you know she could use the money.

    I used to wait tables and if something like that happened to me, I would hold on to the money for a few weeks. If the customer came back for the money, then I would give it back. But if not, I'm keeping it, especially if I have 5 children.

    No reason to get the police involved.

    Not easily outraged.

    by kefauver on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 06:27:47 AM PDT

    •  Because sadly, there are people who still think (6+ / 0-)

      police are there to help their communities.  And I think they used to be there for that purpose.  Now?  Not so much.

      "Speak the TRUTH, even if your voice shakes."

      by stellaluna on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 07:42:21 AM PDT

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    •  I'd have done what she did (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nowhere Man

      What are you going to do with $12K in cash for which you have no paper trail? Banks are required by law to report large cash deposits, and there would be considerable suspicion given that the woman's family is reported to have widely known financial problems.

      The only thing I'd have done differently is that I'd have had a lawyer at my elbow when I turned over the cash in the first place.

      Better the local cops, who can be pressured by the community into doing the right thing, than Homeland Security or DEA.

      "Do it in the name of Heaven; you can justify it in the end..." - Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter

      by pragmaticidealist on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 08:27:40 AM PDT

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      •  Then Why Not Deposit a Little at a Time? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        howarddream, JesseCW

        She never had to deposit it all at once. It's cash.

        Like I said, I would have sat on it for 2-3 weeks and if the customer never returns for it, keep it.

        She could have deposited eight or nine hundred a week.

        Not easily outraged.

        by kefauver on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 08:51:26 AM PDT

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        •  I'd prefer a paper trail (8+ / 0-)

          Trickling the money into the bank over time, or just using it over time, would be an option, but there are potential problems.

          First, you're going to be stashing a considerable amount of cash in your apartment/house? That wouldn't be my first choice.

          Second, what if someone notices the sudden change in banking habits and decides to pry?

          Third, what if something unanticipated happens -- a fire, unrelated police visit, etc. -- and authorities find all that money hidden in the home?

          I'd rather be up front, create a paper trail, and avoid the potential problems. Better to deal with the police at the start than have someone down the line decide I'm an interesting target for a DEA or IRS investigation, or even the locals once my secretiveness has made them suspicious.

          But others can do what they want; I was just responding to the suggestion that there was no reason to get the police involved. I can see several.

          "Do it in the name of Heaven; you can justify it in the end..." - Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter

          by pragmaticidealist on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 09:07:29 AM PDT

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          •  You Bring Up Some Very Good Points. (0+ / 0-)

            Not easily outraged.

            by kefauver on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 09:13:26 AM PDT

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          •  Why? You think crooks have psychic powers? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            kefauver, CharlieHipHop

            No one knows if you cash in your house.

            No one is going to pry over a waitress getting 30% better tips.

            She's damn lucky she got a dime back.  Losing it all was the most likely outcome of notifying the cops.

            income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

            by JesseCW on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 12:58:04 PM PDT

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            •  Doesn't take psychic powers (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              gfv6800

              According to the linked article, she is a mother of young kids. Young kids talk about all kinds of things to all kinds of people.

              And homes get broken into, all the time, whether or not anyone has reason to think there's a lot of cash in them.

              Will someone necessarily notice a change in cash deposits? Likely not. I didn't say it would happen, only that it could, and could have a huge downside if it did.

              I don't know about you, but when I'm running paycheck to paycheck I'm at my most risk-averse. These seem like readily avoidable risks to me.

              As for your suggestion that the most likely outcome was that the police would keep the money, to some extent that depends on the police where she lives. They seem to have responded pretty readily when she put a little community and legal pressure on them, and I think that's likely the case in most smaller communities. Certainly would have been in all but the largest cities I've lived in. Your community may differ.

              And, as I said, to help preclude official overreach I would have had an attorney with me when I first contacted the police. Like I said -- I'm risk-averse.

              "Do it in the name of Heaven; you can justify it in the end..." - Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter

              by pragmaticidealist on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 01:16:48 PM PDT

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              •  Young kids talk about stuff they know about. (0+ / 0-)

                People are (so far) still allowed to just pay cash for things.

                No one is going to track you down because your kid has new shoes or because you start buying better cereal.

                income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

                by JesseCW on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 04:14:56 PM PDT

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            •  Exactly what I was thinking (0+ / 0-)

              Bury it in the back yard in a coffee can (figuratively speaking, of course; literally -- hide it very well) and just bump your declared tips up over a year or so.

              Shouldn't be at all difficult for a waitress to "launder" (not really the right term because the money's not actually dirty) 12 large.

        •  The thing is, you don't know what kind of person (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ColoTim

          left that money, on purpose or accidentally.

          Some people will come back looking for their money and they might do some pretty drastic things to the person who has/had it.

          Say you found a drug runner's $12,000 in a paper bag beside your car where he stashed it as the police followed him. If he doesn't get that money to the kingpin, his life is on the line.  He knows you have it.  Think he'll ask politely.

          If you give it to the police, at least the police will know why the guy killed you. Or have an idea. Obviously, as pointed out in the diary, that leads to other problems.

          "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

          by YucatanMan on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 10:38:48 AM PDT

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          •  Yes, We Do Know What Kind of Person Left the Money (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            howarddream, JesseCW, mike101

            From the article:

            Knutson followed the customer out to parking lot and tried to give her the box but the woman told her to keep it.
            It wasn't from a drug dealer.

            Also, as I mentioned above, if it were me, I would have held on to the money for 2-3 weeks. If the woman or someone else didn't come to get it back, then I keep it.

            I'm really shocked at all of the extremely paranoid "What If" scenario responses that I have received. It's as if everyone has been watching a Law & Order SVU marathon or something.

            Now her name is published in the paper and on the web for everyone to see that she has received the $12,000. So now she has nothing to worry about?!

            Not easily outraged.

            by kefauver on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 12:14:22 PM PDT

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            •  A lot of friends (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              howarddream, YucatanMan

              she hasn't talked to in years, and family members will be contacting her.

              “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

              by skohayes on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 02:50:05 PM PDT

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            •  Women aren't drug dealers? just a hypothetical (0+ / 0-)

              question.

              Fact is, these days, most legit people are simply not carrying around huge sums of money unless they are on the way from their business to the bank.  

              Yes, yes, regular folks occasionally withdraw a large amount to undertake some transaction, but they don't just regularly give away 5 figure sums of money.

              It's strange behavior and if, like most, I were to think the police were here to serve and protect, I'd ask them before keeping it. If anything, just to insure there hadn't been a bank robbery or whatever, for which I might be blamed when I deposited the (serial number tracked?) money.

              Too bad that the police are not always here to serve and protect. . .

              "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

              by YucatanMan on Wed Mar 20, 2013 at 02:50:13 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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