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View Diary: Iraq and lessons for the 'war on the deficit' (113 comments)

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  •  One of my stranger moments on Daily Kos (1+ / 0-)
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    offgrid

    One of my stranger and more surreal moments on Daily Kos was when I got a personal e-mail message from thereisnospoon (David Atkins, who now blogs with Digby), taking me to task for slamming the Afghanistan war which he had supported.

    He had argued that Afghanistan had attacked us on 9/11, equating the Taliban government with AQ or whoever. I wrote back to say that, as a country, Afghanistan had not attacked us; as one of the world's poorest and weakest countries, had absolutely nothing to gain from attacking us; and (whatever one thinks of such offers) had publicly offered to extradite OBL if the U.S. would present proof that OBL was involved.

    The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

    by lotlizard on Mon Mar 25, 2013 at 12:18:57 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I was having conversations with Kossacks as (1+ / 0-)
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      lotlizard

      late as 2008 and 2009 who argued that 9-11 was the Taliban's fault because they allowed Bin Laden to live there (a silly argument) and besides the Taliban were bad guys who were anti-women (an irrelevant argument). And they also argued that terrorists don't deserve trials and we should just bomb them all (a Republican argument).

      And during Obama's "surge" in Afghanistan, you could still find people here who thought we were gonna "win the war".

      In terms of percentage of troops killed, Afghanistan has been far deadlier than Iraq.  Iraq had more US troops there and a higher number of deaths, but Afghanistan had a higher proportion of troops killed or wounded than Iraq. If you were a soldier, you had much higher odds of becoming a casualty in Afghanistan than you did in Iraq.

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