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View Diary: Utah Gun Lobbyist's Thermal Scope Assault Rifle Stolen From His Car (244 comments)

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  •  So, I have a technical gun question (5+ / 0-)

    ALERT to RKBA -ers who like to patronize people who have less gun knowledge than they do. Knock yourselves out here; but I'm asking because I don't know this, not because I'm stooopid.

    Above in this diary's comments there was mention that this now-stolen, registered gun would only have a serial number on the "lower". And that this meant it would be broken up and equipped with a new, clean, lower and thus become legally(?) resaleable.

    How come the uppers aren't also serial numbered? How much of a rifle's architecture is contained in the "uppers"?

    And how come you can (apparently) easily order up a new lower for the gun w/o presenting the old lower? Seems like it's obvious that this is happening and stopping this would be an easy fix to de-incentivize weapon theft.

    Just askin.

    Araguato

    •  I would love to know as well (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PsychoSavannah

      why aren't all the parts of the gun serialized? and why is it so easy to switch out? seems deliberate. should be a no brainer to change in this some gun laws - doesn't restrict any 2nd amendment rights, now does it?

      "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

      by eXtina on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 06:04:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Well It's The Modular Design Of The AR Family (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Araguato, eXtina

      because it's a military gun.  An AR breaks open like a double barrel shotgun for cleaning and service. In the consumer market, this is used to facilitate the interchange of parts and accessories.  

      You can change the barrel on a gun, and a barrel isn't registered because it's an interchangable part.   Some people want a shorter barrel, a longer barrel, a heavier target barrel.  If you have the coin, you can actually buy an upper in a different caliber.

      There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

      by bernardpliers on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:27:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  OK, I get it (or think I do) (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        eXtina

        I used to own a hand gun with several field-interchangeable barrels of different  lengths.

        But the value of the gun was not in the barrels (well, I think the longest barrel which I didn't own may have been pricey), so this makes sense.

        But IIRC, the serial number on my gun wasn't on the barrel, but on the frame, so I guess it is different from the stolen gun.  And certainly the main economic value was in the frame.

        It seems a no- brainer, anti-theft proposition that all significant sections of guns could have serial numbers to make a stolen gun less parts-able.

        Aren't significant, valuable parts of cars made that way: air bags, trannies, radios etc.? (They are in our old cars, I'm pretty sure.)

        Thank you for the explanation about definition of lower assembly and reason (ex-mil. design).

        Araguato

      •  Re: (0+ / 0-)

        This is not unique to the AR, or black guns, or even century old bolt action and semi automatic rifles.  Just about every firearm made since even before the Revolutionary War is modular.  Had to be, because you had to maintain them in the field.

        The AR is just easier than most (in some respects) to customize.  It's not necessarily easier to strip than, say, a Garand.  Considerably more parts, for one.

        When God gives you lemons, you find a new god.

        by Patrick Costighan on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 08:28:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I'll try to answer (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Patrick Costighan

      "Above in this diary's comments there was mention that this now-stolen, registered gun would only have a serial number on the 'lower'. And that this meant it would be broken up and equipped with a new, clean, lower and thus become legally(?) resaleable."

      This is true of any firearm. You can buy a new slide for your firearm and replace the old one on the frame.

      One reason to do so is because you want to shoot a different (and often cheaper) caliber. I have a .22LR slide kit for one of my 9mm pistols, for instance, because the rounds are much cheaper and the recoil nonexistent. It's more fun and economical for an extended session at the range.

      That's not the only reason, of course. For an AR-15, you might have a lightweight upper that is easier to hold for extended periods. You might have a specialized precision upper for matches. You can customize AR-15s quite a bit for whatever shooting event you're going to use it for.

      That's one reason they're so popular: you don't have to buy a whole new rifle for every use. You can buy a lower and manage to own a hunting rifle, three-gun match rifle, plinker, and precise long-range target shooter for much less than buying four separate complete rifles.

      "How come the uppers aren't also serial numbered? How much of a rifle's architecture is contained in the 'uppers'?"

      For an AR-15, the upper includes the barrel, the upper receiver, the bolt assembly, the charging handle, the forward assist, and the sights and/or rail to attach optics. I'm not really sure what point there would be to putting a serial number on any of those parts, though, given that they are interchangeable even within the upper receiver. In other words, you can replace the barrel, bolt assembly, etc. of an upper receiver. Many of them come completely stripped, in fact, and require the owner to put the parts in himself or herself.

      "And how come you can (apparently) easily order up a new lower for the gun w/o presenting the old lower? "

      You can buy a new firearm without having to turn in an old one. The AR-15 is no different. If you want a new lower, you go to buy one at a local gun store or---more common these days, I think---order it online and have it ship to a local FFL.

      My guess is that the confusion is over the term "lower." The lower is the receiver, which is the gun part of the firearm as far as the law is concerned, and for AR-15s, it is very common to simply buy a stripped lower and add the trigger, hammer, magazine release, etc. yourself.

    •  asdf (0+ / 0-)

      Good questions.  And I second andalusi's response.

      When God gives you lemons, you find a new god.

      by Patrick Costighan on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 08:22:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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