Skip to main content

View Diary: How 'This American Life' got the disability story wrong (146 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Define "milking" (22+ / 0-)

    I, too, have a family member who if she did not have family support would not be able to live in any way independently without disability. Works intermittently, somehow manages to make medical insurance payments (I suspect with family assistance.)

    Using the term "dignity" betrays biases.

    I am a physician who has worked in several situations where I have had to complete federal disability paperwork. Here's one of the big problems: the system presumes that if you can work, you can a) get a job and b) that job will provide either health insurance benefits or will pay you enough to buy insurance. Neither of these situations is true for the vast majority of people who find themselves in this situation.

    There are people who are fully functional when they are able to get access to health care, and at that time they almost certainly can work, and many of those I have seen in this position would choose to do so. But the jobs they could get would not allow them to get their healthcare and then they fall back into an inability to function reasonably and reliably for a job.

    It is a serious Catch-22 and a major problem in the system.

    Diversity may be the hardest thing for a society to live with, and perhaps the most dangerous thing for a society to be without - W S Coffin

    by stitchmd on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 10:07:36 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  This! (6+ / 0-)

      A thousand times This! This is the problem. People want to work, many can even get a job, but that job does not allow them the benefit of having or accessing in an efficient or cost effective manner any healthcare or childcare.

    •  An SSDI story (7+ / 0-)

      After I could no longer work professionally, I worked a number of years in low-paying, entry-level jobs without benefits. Eventually I was unable to do even that. When I finally decided to apply for SSDI and it was granted, I had been unable to work for so long that my Medicare began almost immediately (it takes 2 years for this to happen, 6 months until eligibility for SSDI and 18 months after that). I won't ask for the logic of saying a person is too disabled to work and making them wait so long for health coverage.

      But I do know that this idea of milking the system is offensive and untrue for me and for almost everyone I know on disability. For those of us who become underemployed before admitting that we can't support ourselves, it is beyond insulting.

      Republicans want to make government small enough to fit in your vagina..

      by ramara on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 12:57:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Taking disability when you are able to work. (0+ / 0-)

      I know several people who are on long term psych disability who tell me that they don't take any medication and, to all appearances, could work.   They joke about it, lead very leisurely lives and tell me that they prefer disability to working, even though their life style is pretty spartan.  

      I am sure there are lots out there just like them.  

      That being said, they are all a little "off", personality wise, and might have problems in jobs that required a lot of client contact.  

      Not everyone is part of a Gestalt - Owsley Stanley

      by SpamNunn on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 01:16:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You do realize that is the disability equivalent (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        whaddaya, peptabysmal, kaliope

        of the "welfare queen," right?

        Sure there are cases like that, but they get more press than the actual extent of their ilk in the system.

        Diversity may be the hardest thing for a society to live with, and perhaps the most dangerous thing for a society to be without - W S Coffin

        by stitchmd on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 03:35:15 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I know people who are on disability (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        whaddaya, kaliope

        and their problems are psychological in nature (depression and bipolar mostly).  They would like to work, but know that they may wind up not getting hired at all, or in a workplace that could trigger their issues and make them worse.

        Not taking that into account makes you look like a jerk.  I am disabled, and I personally have enough of a time trying to convince people of that (including my own therapist-!), let alone find myself a job where I know my talents would shine.  People like you aren't helping when you don't recognize those of us with "invisible" disabilities have our own set of problems that might make working difficult.

    •  Not for that person. (0+ / 0-)
      Using the term "dignity" betrays biases.
      She said she would have "lost her dignity" (her words, not mine) if she had taken the disability route.  

      Not everyone is part of a Gestalt - Owsley Stanley

      by SpamNunn on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 01:18:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site