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View Diary: Exxon-Mobil tar sands pipeline ruptures. Neighborhood evacuated. (181 comments)

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  •  I live near a natural gas pipeline (16+ / 0-)

    that feeds cities (my rural town does not have gas service) and we get a yearly packet telling us to call if we smell a gas leak and to be careful around the pipe.  I would hope the oil industry would do the same but they are not known for being all that truthful.

    •  and then there is california - where we lost lives (6+ / 0-)

      and homes to a leak and explosion in san bruno, ca, in a buried underground gas pipeline.  after the explosion, pg&e started notifiying homes near pipelines - where i used to live was one.  that is one unnerving notice to receive.

      here is the youtube video of the explosion aftermath - read the info onscreen - but i would suggest muting the sound.  it is an annoying band that, under other circumstances might well be tolerable.

      EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

      by edrie on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 09:46:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well if you have gas at your home (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pgm 01, nextstep, AllisonInSeattle, elwior

        You obviously have gas pipelines supplying it. It is potential dangerous, but considering how many homes have access to gas, leaks - especially the big ones that cause explosions are really rare.

        •  jeebus! are you really that unaware of the news (6+ / 0-)

          of the san bruno explosion?  multiple homes destroyed and deaths?  it was a major pipeline, not a feeder line to a house.

          you should go read a bit before you make such a statement as you did.

          the entire infrastructure is from the mid to late 50s and the lines are on the san andreas fault and other fault lines in the bay area.

          your comment is really somewhat simplistic considering the nature of the problem and the explosion that occurred and why.

          just read a bit here to understand why this is NOT a simple "gas line" explosion.

          damn.  8 people died.  multiple homes destroyed.  a firestorm that swept through a neighborhood.  why?  no construction nearby - it was a damned leak in an aging infrastructure in a pipe that was mislabeled as "seamless" when it was anything but - and pg&e knew about the problems!

          and...

          it's not the only one.

          homeowners, renters, businesses have no idea how close they are to this type of disaster.  reading the road signs that advise of buried pipelines are not recognized by people because they are uninformed by those who are responsible for those pipelines.

          and you want to "dismiss" this because "if you have gas..." - well, your observations are bloated with an ignorance that can kill you and many others.

          wake up, please!

          do YOU know what a natural gas pipeline marker looks like? (hint: yellow and orange diagonal markers...) - bet you've seen them beside the road right of way without having a clue what you were looking at.)

          EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

          by edrie on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 12:34:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  here are the omitted links... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            elwior, pgm 01

            (damn that "add" key)

            hint: yellow and orange diagonal markers

            hint: yellow and orange diagonal markers

            information on the pipeline explosion in san bruno

            EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

            by edrie on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 12:38:23 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Of course i heard of it (0+ / 0-)

            Tragic. But it is still really rare considering pretty much every modern house has a gas line running into it.

            •  again, this was NOT a "gas line" running to a (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              elwior

              single house - it was the buried infrastructure that transports natural gas throughout a large swathe of the state.  the key here is the "aging infrastructure" issue.  that it has, to date, been "rare" is not significant when you consider how many other transport lines (not just for natural gas, but petroleum products, water, sewer) that are very old.  

              many of the water lines in san francisco, for example, were put in place over 100 years ago.

              we are a nation that is running on borrowed time before these types of explosions become the norm instead of the reality.

              to ignore that reality is done at everyone's peril.

              EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

              by edrie on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 12:29:13 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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