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View Diary: Rethinking Education (12 comments)

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  •  My two questions: (0+ / 0-)

    If we start by assuming that all children are motivated to learn and rethink education from the ground up, what could education look like?

    Since all children start out motivated to learn, what should we get rid of immediately in current educational systems?

    "Trust only those who doubt" Lu Xun

    by LookingUp on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 06:29:39 AM PDT

    •  Two answers... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LookingUp

      I would propose more choice,more independent study, more parental involvement, less standardized learning, greatly reduced standardized testing, zero memorization, more localized problem-solving and collaboration.

      I would immediately get rid High School as we know it and shift to smaller, regional learning and community centers where students were free to visit at any time during the day.

      •  "Localized problem-solving" apparently (0+ / 0-)

        means selecting answers that ignore context and consequences:
        "If one assumes that organizations' decision making actors have limited rationality (see bounded rationality), then it follows that decisions will be made in terms of localized disturbances to which abbreviated analyzes will be applied, with short-term recommendations as the result. A search for more stable solutions (i.e., those that will solve the problem once and for all) is unlikely; consequences are not given much attention, and apparently logical solutions may prove faulty as their consequences ramify. Furthermore, since the consequences of a decision often occur much later than the decision itself, it is difficult for the members to trace backward from these disruptive consequences to determine precisely what caused them. The members cannot make such an analysis, simply because there are too many competing explanations. Thus, the only thing members can do when a new problem arises is to engage in more localized problem solving. Weick, 1979, pp 20-21.

      •  In practice, (0+ / 0-)

        our school aggressively solicits parental involvement and finds it very difficult to get parents involved.

        Fundamentally, even when parents value and pay attention to their kids' education, they're pretty busy working and commuting and don't have a lot of time left over.

        I'm not sure how, within the constraints of the existing system, schools get more involvement. I'm eager to learn of new strategies if you know of successful ones that could be emulated.

        One of the things I come back to is that in Finland, our current model of educational envy, workers have 6 weeks paid vacation. It seems to me that a lot of workers would spend that time with their kids in various meaningful activities, even relatively "nonacademic" ones like traveling, that could make serious differences in educational achievement.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Mon Apr 01, 2013 at 12:48:16 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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