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View Diary: Question wording makes all the difference in immigration polling (61 comments)

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  •  I have some of the same feeling but for different (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    decembersue, lgmcp, ivorybill

    reasons. Most of the undocumented have been paying taxes all along -- sales tax. Since for a lot of them their incomes are quite low, I doubt that they really should be paying back taxes on income. And many have, because they use fake social security numbers, been paying into the Medicare & Social Security system without ever being able to derive any benefits from their contributions.
    They use very few public services because they avoid anything official. They're cheap dates, so to speak.
    As for going to the back of the line for citizenship, I'd be all for that if it were a reasonable line. But from what I hear, the length of time for a legal immigrant to become a citizen is now so horrendous, that being in the back of the line might mean not becoming a citizen until you're close to death. Which is exactly what the Republicans want.

    While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

    by Tamar on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 11:38:24 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Where have you heard (0+ / 0-)

      That it takes a long time for a legal immigrant to become a citizen?  I can't find anything to back up that claim.

      •  It took my uncle's wife almost 10 years and she (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Tamar, Yonkers Boy, ivorybill

        came here with a lot of money and had lawyers to work with her from day 1.  She was also already married to a citizen and had children that were citizens.  She also has an advanced degree.  It can take a much longer time for someone of modest means and no education...much less money to afford help legally.

      •  Relative petitions from many countries (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Tamar

        take upwards of ten or twelve years.  Then there's usually 5 1/2 to 6 years before a permanent resident becomes eligible for citizenship.

        If you have a sibling or a parent and you apply for them to join you in the US, it can easily take the better part of two decades (if at all) for that person to get here "legally", adjust status and become a citizen.

        I have heard - but do not have the source - that one of the compromise positions for compreyhensive immigration reform is for undocumented immigrants to get work authorization but be delayed in getting permanent residence, and then be on a pathway to citizenship that might take up to 18 years.  I wish I had a citation for that, so take it with a grain of salt.

        “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” Charles Darwin

        by ivorybill on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 12:55:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  In virtually all cases, lawful permenent residence (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ivorybill

          a.k.a. "green card' status must precede citizenship for five years of "good moral character."  If you obtained your LPR status through an immediate relative petition (spouse, for example), as long as you continue to live in marital union, you will be eligible to apply for citizenship after three years.  

          Regarding timing, when you get to the lower level preference rates (a.k.a. the DOS "visa bulletin"), the waits become way longer.  The 10, 15, 20 year waits often involved those types of cases (siblings of U.S. Citizens, for example, are NOT immediate relatives).  Sometimes, asylum applicants do not receive "individual hearings" before an immigration judge for 7, 8 years or more.  The reasons for this will vary.

          Mix the blood and make new people!

          by Yonkers Boy on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 01:40:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I will admit that my source is the Rachel Maddow (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Yonkers Boy, ivorybill

        show. Usually I check sources more carefully. So because of your question I did a search -- easily came up with this:

        For example, there currently is an 18-year backlog for the adult, unmarried Mexican sons and daughters of U.S. citizens who initiate paperwork to immigrate to the United States, Stump said. For married Mexican sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, the backlog is nearly 19 years.
        http://www.tulsaworld.com/...
        and this:
        For example, in January 2011 the priority date for which visas were being allocated for the category of siblings of U.S. citizens was January 1, 2002. By February 2011, the priority date had actually receded to January 1, 2000.
        http://www.immigrationforum.org/...

        From what I've read so far, there's a big range of wait time from a few years to many many years depending on which category you're in. Since people are saying "back of the line" for undocumented residents, my guess is that means they'd be at the upper end of the range.

        While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

        by Tamar on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 01:39:39 PM PDT

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        •  Clarificatin re unmarried sons and daughters. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ivorybill

          These are unmarried ADULTS over the age of 21 who generally have parents who recently naturalized.  IF you are under the age of 18, and your parent naturalizes now, you will obtain "acquired" U.S. Citizenship automatically (assuming the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 applies to you).  Between 18 and 21, if unmarried, you would still qualify as an "immediate relative" but not for acquired USC status.  Folks over the age of 21 AND unmarried are just not treated with a ton of concern by our government.  PARENTS of USCs, however, are always immediate relatives once the USC child turns 21 (whether married or not).  That is the "anchor baby" argument--it is more like an "anchor-adult-old-enough-to-drink-alcohol" argument.

          Mix the blood and make new people!

          by Yonkers Boy on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 02:02:53 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  my point was that there are plenty of people (0+ / 0-)

            who are relatives of citizens who have hugely long waits for citizenship. If the undocumented are put at the end of the line, I would assume that would be behind these people.

            While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

            by Tamar on Wed Apr 03, 2013 at 11:12:49 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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