Skip to main content

View Diary: The Ongoing War on Christianity (172 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Isn't that sort of (0+ / 0-)

    idealization part of the problem though?  People excuse the sins of the worldly religious institutions based on the premise that it's an imperfect realization of a perfect ideal.  In this way they allow that horror to be perpetrated again and again.

    •  Aspiring to a greater cause (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JosephK74

      Is a tricky matter.   In the end, almost everything falls short.  People on here largely know that I am an atheist.  But it doesn't mean I can't see value in people who find hope in their religion and see good within it.   It is not for me, and I don't recognize it as a higher power; but at the same time, my telling people "abandon all of it" will be met with deaf ears.

      As opposed to encouraging people to find the hope and promise that attracted the original followers of any faith and say: how do you stand next to the higher causes proposed here?

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 04:18:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh don't get me wrong. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Yahzi

        Matters are different when discussing philosophy and practice.  When it's a matter of practice, I'm not too concerned with why people advocate the values they do, just that they advocate those values.  If one arrives at their values through Buddha, Jesus, Epicureanism, Utilitarianism, Marx, and so on is of little concern to me.  If the discussion is a matter of philosophy, then questions of true grounds become important.  I personally find many of the theism vs atheism debates uninteresting.  As far as I'm concerned, the only interesting issue of practice is how certain religious orientations affect public life and governance.  It's a purely sociological issue for me.  I thus have no truck with Liberal Catholics or Unitarians that don't negatively impact public life with their beliefs.

        The one point I'd make is that I think we need to understand that these aren't issues of private belief.  Suppose you have a Catholic of progressive persuasion that disagrees with the church on many points, advocates contraceptives, gay marriage, etc.  Great!  The problem is that if this progressive Catholic is attending a Catholic church and giving a percent of their income to that church, they are promoting an anti-gay agenda, anti-contraceptives, a pro-life agenda, etc., through how their money contributes to political efforts to engage in these oppressive policies.  In cases like this, it's not that I have a problem with a person's beliefs or theology, but with how they are providing economic funding to an oppressive organization.

        •  I think this is a reasoned, person to person (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JosephK74, SchuyH

          Response, however the reality remains that per population, the majority of americans are affiliated with one faith or another.   Asking them to leave their faiths, despite all of their faults is just not going to happen.  

          But, appealing to the better viewpoints of those may lead to a better political - and social climate, and in the end, we cannot cut off our nose to spite our face, we need those voters and those people who can accept both their faith and the view of social issues that aligns with the real world ;)

          Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

          by Chris Reeves on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 05:39:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site