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View Diary: Notes on Shallow: Why Justin Bieber Is Shallow, but Tim Gunn Is Not (22 comments)

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  •  Any thought son why the models' expressions so (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sidnora

    often are off-putting?

    •  That's a good question. (0+ / 0-)

      And not one I have a pat answer for.

       It might have something to do with forcing the viewer to focus on the clothing rather than the models; as has often been noted by people concerned about anorexia among these very young and dangerously thin women, they are really not meant to be seen as human, but rather as walking clothes hangers. Also most of those clothes are never worn by real people off the runway. Instead, they serve as direction for people who design clothing for the 99%.

      And there's a related phenomenon: the less expensive the clothing being modeled, the nicer (by normal standards) the models look. Less anorexic, and they smile!

      "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

      by sidnora on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:10:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Huh. It never occurred to me that the clothes were (0+ / 0-)

        meant only as direction. I remember from GRADE SCHOOL an illustration of some kind of trendy boy's jacket, next to a blazer. Even then, they pointed out that the trendy jacket would go out of style soon, but the blazer would not. I guess not enough people saw that illustration.

        •  That's only true for (0+ / 0-)

          couture (which is what you see on the runway models). Those clothes are so expensive to produce that only the very wealthiest can afford to wear them, and the styles are often far too extreme for most wealthy (trans: older) women to wear. A few pieces do turn up on the backs of young socialites.

          And they're not expensive just because they've got a fancy label on them; they're expensive because they cost a fortune to produce. They use the most luxurious of materials, and most of the labor is done by hand, including embroideries, beading etc. that are extremely time-consuming and require specialized expertise. And of course every piece is custom-made and fitted to the client. They don't make huge amounts of money on this.

          If they had to depend on sales of their originals, most couture houses would be out of business tomorrow. They make most of their money on the stuff that is expensive just because it's got a fancy label on it: licensed goods. That means mostly handbags, fragrances, scarves, shoes and other accessories. These are not made by the design house, but by a manufacturer who pays to license the name. The design house either provides the designs, or signs off on designs provided by the manufacturer. Some also make a lower-priced ready-to-wear clothing line, which is manufactured commercially.

          "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

          by sidnora on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:40:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Seems awful silly. In "Prada," fashion maven (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sidnora

            Miranda always wears a white Herme`s scarf. Our heroine remarks on its simple elegance, but never does explain why a white scarf by Herme`s is worth $500, whereas a white scarf by, say, Sheldon Shlabotnik is worth $5.

            •  That's because there is no such thing. (0+ / 0-)

              Hermes would never make a white scarf. I never read the book (I did see the movie), but this detail makes me wonder how much the writer actually knows about the world of fashion.

              Hermes scarves, which can cost upwards of $800, are always vibrantly-colored and complicated screen prints. The printing alone typically requires 15-20 separate hand-screening operations, all done on high-quality silk (because no other material takes color like silk), to extremely fine tolerances. If even one of those 15-20 screenings is off-register by a millimeter, that scarf is no longer salable. How do I, who could never afford to own one, know this? I have a wealthy friend who collects them. I've seen the ones she wears, and she once got me into a Hermes sample sale (where they were still too expensive for me to buy one!). And I got schooled.

              You can see what real Hermes scarves look like here.

              As a last note, even a plain white silk scarf by Sheldon Shlabotnick would cost more than $5. That's what a synthetic scarf made in a third world country would cost, bought from a street vendor. I wear silk scarves from much less exalted makers than Hermes, and I expect to spend $30-$125 for one, depending on size, printing, and whether it's on sale.

              "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

              by sidnora on Thu May 16, 2013 at 07:53:23 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  It may not have been a scarf--memory doesn't (0+ / 0-)

                serve. My point was that it was good enough for Miranda because it was by Hermes (Sorry, Sheldon.)

                $125 for a scarf? Yowza. I went bow (-tie) a few years ago and most of mine were bought at Syms (of memory every blessed). Some are flimsy, some are too thick and thus hard to knot, bu most are JUST RIGHT and they were quite inexpensive for a long time. $30 is the most I've ever paid, and that's because it was a pattern I'd never seen before or since and I figured one expensive bowtie wouldn't kill me. I stay away from haberdashers because I always feel vaguely guilty not buying something. OTOH, they sell bowties for $45 and up, and I wouldn't pay that for a four-in-hand tie that contains 5x the silk.

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