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View Diary: Are Chechens Really White? Racial Formation Theory and the Boston Marathon Bombing (207 comments)

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  •  Slavs (0+ / 0-)

    I'm not entirely sure many Slavs really consider anyone who's not Slavic to be truly white.

    •  That's ridiculous. I'm a Slav. (4+ / 0-)
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      AoT, pico, FG, Be Skeptical

      I know no Slavs, none whatsoever, either here in the US or back in the old country, who believe Germans or English, or Swedes or Italians or any other European nationality are anything other than white.

      "Some folks rob you with a six-gun, some rob you with a fountain pen." - Woody Guthrie

      by Involuntary Exile on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 02:44:11 PM PDT

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    •  Most definitely not true. (3+ / 0-)
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      Involuntary Exile, FG, AoT

      Slavs - at least those concerned with the label - have tried to carve out a space for themselves usually in opposition to Western Europe.  In fact the Russian side of the panslavist movement specifically aimed at defining themselves as a Eurasian people, and that their Asiatic roots (whatever they were, and whatever they meant) distinguished them from the peoples to their West.  Western and Southern Slavs have had different dialogues because of their regional histories, but I've never heard of any claiming the sole banner of the "truly white".

      Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

      by pico on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 02:58:17 PM PDT

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      •  It's my impression that the Pan-Slavists (3+ / 0-)
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        AoT, Involuntary Exile, pico

        intended a reference to the Byzantine Empire by their references to Asia. Hence Russia's designation as the "third Rome."

        Nothing human is alien to me.

        by WB Reeves on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 03:17:41 PM PDT

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        •  The quick version: it depends a bit on (0+ / 0-)

          which group of panslavists we're talking about.  For the Western and Southern Slavs the alleged "Asianness" was never much of an issue anyway, or - especially for the South Slavs, it often had negative connotations.  In the case of Russia, where panslavism was typically a euphemism for "Russia's sphere of influence", the Asiatic bit was variously linked to the Tatars, or the Mongols, or even the Scythians.  There'd been enough of Russians with mixed heritage that outsiders considered them "Asiatic" centuries ago (most famously, the "Tatar" Derzhavin).  But it becomes really important in the 19th century among the Slavophiles trying to argue a unique ethnic identity for Russia.

          The Byzantine thing is definitely there for the cultural/religious/"moral" heritage, but they tended to go further East for the ethnic self-identity.

          Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

          by pico on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 04:30:02 PM PDT

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          •  Yes, you remind me (1+ / 0-)
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            pico

            Wasn't it the Poet Aleksandr Blok who compose a work on that theme entitled The Scythians?

            Nothing human is alien to me.

            by WB Reeves on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 07:33:24 PM PDT

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            •  Yep. Based partially on Vladimir Solov'ev's (1+ / 0-)
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              WB Reeves

              poem "Pan-Mongolism" (there's a decent literal translation here.)

              It's telling that Blok elides between the ancient Scythians and the more contemporary (by comparison) Mongols, as if they're interchangeable.  But for both of them, they use it to mean Russia's deeply-embedded "Eastern" identity.

              Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

              by pico on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 07:40:26 PM PDT

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